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Does a Fan On a Wood/Coal Stove Produce More Heat or Just Dispurse It?

by tony17112acst
Tags: dispurse, heat, produce, stove, wood or coal
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tony17112acst
#19
Jan12-14, 07:49 PM
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OK, I am convinced that a fan WILL extract more heat from the stove because of the principle that heat transfers through a medium more quickly as the temperatures on either side are further apart.

Thanks VERY MUCH for your time and explaining this to me!! I will report back to the coal/wood stove forum that a fan will produce more BTU's!

Thanks again!
-Tony
SteamKing
#20
Jan12-14, 07:52 PM
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Fans are mounted on car radiators now for a variety of reasons.

1. The fans are no longer directly driven by engine accessory belts.
2. Electrically-driven fans can be thermostatically controlled to operate only when the engine coolant temp. rises beyond a set point. This means that the engine is not driving the fan when it is not needed to cool the engine, which improves fuel economy by a small amount.
3. Cooling performance doesn't drop off as much with the electric fan in stop-and-go traffic, reducing the chance that you car will overheat in traffic jams.
4. In front wheel drive cars with transversely mounted engines, engine driven fans are not practical, so you must have an electrical fan mounted on the radiator. Ditto for the few mid-engine or rear-engine cars.
CWatters
#21
Jan13-14, 12:44 AM
P: 3,231
Quote Quote by tony17112acst View Post
Why will more heat be sent into the room by cooling the stove/pipe? Is there a principle that heat transfers through a medium (metal) more quickly if the inside and outside temperatures (relatively speaking) are further apart?
Yes, although "more easily" is better than "more quickly".

Power = Thermal resistance * Temperature difference

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_resistance
Buckleymanor
#22
Jan13-14, 02:47 AM
P: 504
Quote Quote by SteamKing View Post
Look at it this way: if the stove has the same temperature as its surroundings, no heat transfer can take place.
This is true,but it ain't half hot mum.
sophiecentaur
#23
Jan13-14, 03:55 AM
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Quote Quote by tony17112acst View Post
OMG, finally an answer!

Why will more heat be sent into the room by cooling the stove/pipe? Is there a principle that heat transfers through a medium (metal) more quickly if the inside and outside temperatures (relatively speaking) are further apart?
OI!! Don't be cheeky (anyone would think you were paying consultation fees ). When you present a properly constructed question, in the right terms, then you can demand a proper answer straight away. Your question was very vague and it took a while to discern at what level you were operating.

The ideal heating (combustion) system will dump its waste gases into the outside, at the same temperature as the inside. This is never quite possible but a condensing gas boiler does quite a good job. Which makes me wonder what sort of fan you were originally suggesting. Would this be an exhaust fan or a room circulation fan? An exhaust fan and balanced flue could help a lot with efficiency.
CWatters
#24
Jan13-14, 05:36 AM
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Perhaps he means this sort of fan..

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Valiant-FIR3.../dp/B00748I2MO
sophiecentaur
#25
Jan13-14, 06:08 AM
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Quote Quote by CWatters View Post
Perhaps he means this sort of fan..

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Valiant-FIR3.../dp/B00748I2MO
HaHa. You rather get the impression that fan was not designed by a heating specialist - or by anyone concerned with health and safety. Chopchopchop


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