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Math problem

by eahaidar
Tags: math
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eahaidar
#1
May15-14, 08:13 PM
P: 60
Hello everyone
I want to solve this equation
F(x)=Ax/((bx*x)+c =constant which is an odd function in which we get same positive and negative solutions for each F
But If I solve his equation I get two different x values for The same F any suggestions??
Thank you
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Mark44
#2
May15-14, 08:38 PM
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P: 21,249
Quote Quote by eahaidar View Post
Hello everyone
I want to solve this equation
F(x)=Ax/((bx*x)+c =constant which is an odd function in which we get same positive and negative solutions for each F
But If I solve his equation I get two different x values for The same F any suggestions??
Do you mean two different x values for the same value of what you're calling the constant?

Graph y = x/(x^2 + 1) to get an idea of what your function F looks like.
eahaidar
#3
May15-14, 08:48 PM
P: 60
First thank you for the reply
Second yes these are all constants but what I am asking about is how come if I solve it analytically I would not get 2 values on x same but opposite to each other
But different values of x

Simon Bridge
#4
May15-14, 09:04 PM
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Simon Bridge's Avatar
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Math problem

yes these are all constants
... surely you are treating x as a variable?
You seem to be wanting to solve: $$a=\frac{x}{bx^2+c}$$... here a=<constant>/A which is also a constant.

This becomes ##abx^2-x+ac = 0## which is a quadratic equation.

You are getting two possible values of x for given values of a,b, and c because there are two possible values that make the relation true. What is the problem?

Your concern seems to be that you are getting ##\pm## <the same number> as the roots ... if so, then please show your working.


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