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Classical interpretation of Wave Motion

by cmcraes
Tags: classical, interpretation, motion, wave
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cmcraes
#1
May23-13, 04:49 PM
P: 90
Ive been learning a lot about how similar waves and particles are at the fundamental level, but today i was assaigned to discuss the difference between the CLASSICAL physics of particles vs Classical Physics of waves.
Differences and similarities and well as how momentum is/isnt diferent as well as if a wave can be said to be in/at a certain point in space at a given point in time.
Hope that made sense, Thanks!
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LastOneStanding
#2
May23-13, 05:01 PM
P: 718
Your description of your assignment made sense. But what is your question?
cmcraes
#3
May23-13, 05:27 PM
P: 90
Do we interpret momentum any different with waves?
How do we describe a mechanical waves position?

LastOneStanding
#4
May23-13, 05:40 PM
P: 718
Classical interpretation of Wave Motion

There's a difference between asking for help about something that confuses you, and just asking us to do your homework for you! Do a bit of research first and let us know if there is something you don't understand. At the very least, tell us what you do know about waves that might be relevant to your project. When we know what you know, we'll be able to help you figure out what you don't know. You know?
cmcraes
#5
May23-13, 06:01 PM
P: 90
No no no! This isnt homework at all! Its a bonus question on a test i have coming up, and everywhere i look online i can only find either how they are similar (quantum mechanics) or their definitions.

I was just curious if there is a difference in any of our formulas or definitions that changes when talking about classical waves. thanks though!
physwizard
#6
May23-13, 08:09 PM
P: 153
Quote Quote by cmcraes View Post
No no no! This isnt homework at all! Its a bonus question on a test i have coming up, and everywhere i look online i can only find either how they are similar (quantum mechanics) or their definitions.

I was just curious if there is a difference in any of our formulas or definitions that changes when talking about classical waves. thanks though!
Why don't you read the forum rules?
http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=8128

"As a reminder, please do not post Homework/Schoolwork-type questions here. We have a dedicated forum for that:

Homework, Coursework, & Textbook Questions

This rule applies even if your question is not formally part of a HW/Coursework. Any type of question that has the same resemblance to that covered in a typical schoolwork must be posted in that forum, not in here.

Zz. "

You're in the wrong room.
dipole
#7
May23-13, 10:24 PM
P: 433
Well before you can start asking about these kind of questions you need to look at the physics first - what is the equation for the momentum carried by a wave? What does the equation which describes a wave look like?

Start by writing these down, and then try to understand what they "mean" as best you can. That's how you have to understand things.


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