Register to reply

Doubt in a scene from the movie Gravity

by k.udhay
Tags: doubt, gravity, movie, scene
Share this thread:
D H
#19
Apr19-14, 02:25 AM
Mentor
P: 15,201
Yes, there was. The movie has orbital mechanics all wrong, it has the Kessler syndrome all wrong, and "immediate" means the next few hours to the next few days.

It's a movie, for crying out loud, made by people who are proud of the fact that the last math course they took was 10th grade algebra (and they got a C).
paisiello2
#20
Apr19-14, 02:37 AM
P: 561
Sorry, yes there was what? I was referring to your post #15 that said they would have aborted the mission immediately after the first satellite was destroyed by the russians. You contradicted that with your post #17.
D H
#21
Apr19-14, 02:26 PM
Mentor
P: 15,201
There is no contradiction.

NASA would not "issue a warning and continuously monitor the situation" and then be surprised when "debris from the destroyed satellite hits another satellite causing a chain reaction."

That chain reaction is named after Donald J. Kessler, a now retired Johnson Space Center scientist. NASA has been away of the problem of space debris for a much longer time than has Hollywood. What scares NASA the most isn't the big stuff. There are only 20,000 pieces or so of that, all of it fairly well tracked. What scares NASA are the hundreds of thousands of bullet-sized objects and the millions of little flecks. A bullet-sized object moving at 9 times the muzzle velocity of a 50 cal can do a lot of damage.

From the descriptions I've read and trailers I've seen, the premise and plot are so fatally flawed that I can't pay to watch it. I might watch when its free; then all it will cost me is my time. I suspect that this is the case for almost any movie where a viewer knows too much about the subject. Such viewers can't suspend their disbelief. (Apollo 13 was a marked exception.)
paisiello2
#22
Apr19-14, 03:11 PM
P: 561
I think you did contradict yourself.

Here is what you said in post #15 about the movie:
Quote Quote by D H View Post
That's a big problem in this case. The Flight Dynamics Officers (FIDOs) would have been working like crazy as soon as the first incident occurred. The abort would have been called in minutes, not a situation continuously monitored.
And then here is what you said in post in #17 about the 2007 chinese satellite:
Quote Quote by D H View Post
There was no immediate threat.
I am going to stop responding to your posts. Since you are an administrator on this forum you have the advantage of deleting posts and closing threads at will. So it is a waste of my time engaging with you.
D H
#23
Apr19-14, 06:32 PM
Mentor
P: 15,201
There was no contradiction. You asked me about the 2007 Chinese anti satellite test in post #16. The debris from that test posed no immediate threat. It took several years before that debris came close to the ISS, several more before it wiped out another satellite. The anti satellite test in the thesis of this film *did* pose an immediate threat.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Question about the tether scene from the movie Gravity Classical Physics 16
Quantum Gravity: Lie Groups vs. Banach Algebras & Spectral Theory Academic Guidance 10
Gravitational field vs. acceleration due to gravity Classical Physics 2
The Fugitive Dam Scene - Could Harrison Ford actually survive? Introductory Physics Homework 8
The Merli Electron Interference movie .. any active links ? .. Quantum Physics 0