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K - mixing ?

by Creator
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Creator
#1
Dec16-13, 02:52 PM
P: 555
Can someone explain in simple terms "K mixing level" and "K selectivity" in nuclear decay processes ? ...as it relates to the "K quantum number".
And does it relate directly to the nuclear angular momentum?...and selection rules? How so?
Dumb it down for me please.
Thank you kindly.
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Bill_K
#2
Dec16-13, 05:01 PM
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For a nonspherical nucleus, K is the projection of total angular momentum on the body axis. A K-mixing level is a state which is a superposition of wavefunctions with different values of K. Here's a paper which describes it.
Creator
#3
Dec16-13, 06:07 PM
P: 555
Quote Quote by Bill_K View Post
For a nonspherical nucleus, K is the projection of total angular momentum on the body axis. A K-mixing level is a state which is a superposition of wavefunctions with different values of K. Here's a paper which describes it.
Thanks much, Bill...However, your link is not working; please check it; I would like to read it.
Thanks;
Creator

Bill_K
#4
Dec17-13, 03:20 AM
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K - mixing ?

Sorry, the correct link is http://www.hafniumisomer.org/isomer/97FindIsomer.pdf
Creator
#5
Dec19-13, 11:06 PM
P: 555
Quote Quote by Bill_K View Post
Thanks again Bill; that is the exact article from which I drew my original question. Since you seem to have a better handle on this nuclear isomer business than me, let me take it a step further.
Can you please explain exactly what the author is getting at in the first 3 paragraphs. Is he saying the selection rules prevent EM decay due to high total orbital nuclear angular momentum as compared to change in total A. M. of transition,... (and also since such is the case in which transitional change in K being so much smaller than L ).?? Please explain in detail if you can. Is the isomer meta-stable due to the smallness of delta J or delta K ?
Thanks.
...


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