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Spectrophotometric Reference for Inorganics?

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mishima
#1
Apr15-14, 08:42 AM
P: 303
I am looking for absorbance spectra and extinction coefficients (molar absorptivities) for common inorganic substances like potassium and sodium salts. I am only finding this information for biological substances.

Am I misinterpreting what the spectrophotometer can do? I would like to, for example, use Beer's Law to calculate concentration of a salt in solution after measuring absorbance with a known extinction coefficient.
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Borek
#2
Apr15-14, 08:49 AM
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Does the NaCl solution look colored?

Infrared? UV?
mishima
#3
Apr15-14, 10:34 AM
P: 303
I mean salts in general, like potassium permanganate or copper (II) nitrate. I am unaware if sodium chloride can be used with a spectrophotometer; I was under the impression that some could not.

would like an absorbance spectrum (absorbance vs. wavelength), so all wavelengths. I would have thought this information would be tabulated somewhere, like a chemical handbook, but I am not finding it.

Yanick
#4
Apr15-14, 02:11 PM
P: 380
Spectrophotometric Reference for Inorganics?

You can try here: http://webbook.nist.gov/chemistry/

Failing that you should just try to find the original research. It will likely be old which makes it (kind of) easier to find them for free.


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