Register to reply

Why is W(VI) more stable than Cr(VI)

by sludger13
Tags: crvi, stable
Share this thread:
sludger13
#1
Mar1-14, 11:14 AM
P: 75
I'm not sure why Chromium(VI) is reducing and Tungsten(VI) isn't. I also noticed their radius is quite similar. Is that related?
Phys.Org News Partner Chemistry news on Phys.org
New molecule puts scientists a step closer to understanding hydrogen storage
Chemists develop new formulation for the generation of green flames
Four billion-year-old chemistry in cells today
DrDu
#2
Mar2-14, 02:01 AM
Sci Advisor
P: 3,557
I think it is due to the d-orbitals in Cr being the first ones (3d) they don't have to be orthogonal to inner shells and are therefore relatively more strongly bound than 4d or 5d orbitals in the higher periods. Similar trends can be observed in the other groups, too, e.g. V vs. Nb or Ta, Fe vs Ru or Os.
sludger13
#3
Mar2-14, 03:49 AM
P: 75
So the (3d) orbitals in Tungsten are potentially higher? Is it due to (s) orbitals core repulsion?

DrDu
#4
Mar2-14, 04:49 AM
Sci Advisor
P: 3,557
Why is W(VI) more stable than Cr(VI)

Of course not the 3d orbitals in tungsten, but the 5d orbitals.
If you want to view this as the result of a repulsion, it is rather 3d and 4d Pauli repulsion.
sludger13
#5
Mar2-14, 11:58 AM
P: 75
Ok, could you place here some links... because it's better if I read something for first. The only phenomenon I'm aware of is (ns) orbital energy fall due to Pauli repulsion, and obviously this isn't the entirely same thing.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Is AdS stable? Beyond the Standard Model 11
Radioactive Decay: Are stable elements really stable? High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics 8
Ranking the following from most stable to least stable Biology, Chemistry & Other Homework 1
Stable or not stable equilibrium Advanced Physics Homework 16
Stable Set Calculus & Beyond Homework 1