MilliQ water and RO water


by kkbniist
Tags: milliq, water
kkbniist
kkbniist is offline
#1
Nov29-13, 06:19 AM
P: 2
Hi
can we replace MilliQ water (18.2MΩ) with normal RO water (22KΩ) ?
The application is for preparing buffer for a molecular work.

thanks in advance
kkb
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jim mcnamara
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#2
Nov29-13, 07:55 AM
Sci Advisor
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P: 1,355
I guess so, as long as it does not violate your protocols. In other words, you have to stipulate in your reporting that you did this. Since the amount of information you gave is sparse my answer is equally vague.

Is this is for a lab quiz/project in college? Do the written procedures state that 18.2m Ohms is required? Is some entity paying you to do this work, a client? Generally using milliQ water is done to introduce required repeatability and "bona fides" of an analysis. Only you know what is going on.
kkbniist
kkbniist is offline
#3
Nov29-13, 11:52 PM
P: 2
thanks jim mcnamara
In fact we have a MilliQ system in our lab. But suddenly its membrane needs replacement.
The procurement of the membrane takes some time.
We have many routine molecular biology works that recommends MilliQ water.
Meanwhile, we have an RO system in our lab with.
So I thought of using the RO water which has a much lower conductivity also.

thanks

jim mcnamara
jim mcnamara is offline
#4
Nov30-13, 07:35 AM
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
P: 1,355

MilliQ water and RO water


Sounds like you should keep membranes on hand. You said "suggests" MilliQ water. Most lab protocols are not usually worded that way ("suggested"), hmm. If something is "suggested" that implies it is not required, so RO should be fine. Just report it that way.

If something like an RO setup or a MilliQ, is in the critical path of performing work, good practice is considered to be: 'have replacement parts on hand'. Especially for components that regularly need it.


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