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What is the difference between Boost and Translation?

by suvendu
Tags: boost, difference, translation
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suvendu
#1
Apr10-14, 04:53 PM
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As we face in Poincaré Transformation, there are boost and translational symmetry.What is the difference between these two terms?
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jtbell
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Apr10-14, 04:58 PM
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A "boost" changes an object's velocity. A "translation" merely changes its position.
suvendu
#3
Apr10-14, 05:57 PM
P: 19
Thanks for the reply. So basically boost is a change position with acceleration?

Filip Larsen
#4
Apr10-14, 06:08 PM
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What is the difference between Boost and Translation?

I always read "boost" as short for "Lorentz boost" and simply meaning the Lorentz transformation for a given velocity (speed and direction). For what it is worth, Wikipedia [1] seems to agree with this, with the addition that a boost is a rotation-free Lorentz transformation.

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lorentz_transformation
Meir Achuz
#5
Apr10-14, 08:59 PM
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Quote Quote by suvendu View Post
Thanks for the reply. So basically boost is a change position with acceleration?
No- with constant velocity
jtbell
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Apr10-14, 10:33 PM
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Quote Quote by suvendu View Post
Thanks for the reply. So basically boost is a change position with acceleration?
We're simply changing coordinate systems. No acceleration of the object is involved.

In a translation, the initial and final coordinate systems simply have different origins. There is no relative velocity between these two coordinate systems.

In a boost, the final coordinate system has some velocity relative to the initial coordinate system. The origins of the two coordinate systems often coincide at t = 0.
suvendu
#7
Apr11-14, 06:58 AM
P: 19
Thank you jtbell,Filip and Meir. :)


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