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Anyone read "QFT in a Nutshell" by Zee?

by UVCatastrophe
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UVCatastrophe
#1
Aug21-14, 06:51 PM
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In Chapter IV.3 of Quantum Field Theory in a Nutshell] by A. Zee (2nd Edition), there is a section titled "Wisdom of the son-in-law".

My question is, WTH does that heading have to do with anything in the text? Is this just a common expression? I don't get it.
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kurros
#2
Aug21-14, 07:57 PM
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Yes... Zee is somewhat unconventional. I don't know what he refers to either. I googled the phrase and found some partial match with the Judgement of Solomon, but I can't really see how that is relevant.
haushofer
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Aug22-14, 12:28 PM
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Maybe Jona-Lasinio was Schwinger's son in law.

nrqed
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Aug24-14, 10:10 PM
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Anyone read "QFT in a Nutshell" by Zee?

Quote Quote by UVCatastrophe View Post
In Chapter IV.3 of Quantum Field Theory in a Nutshell] by A. Zee (2nd Edition), there is a section titled "Wisdom of the son-in-law".

My question is, WTH does that heading have to do with anything in the text? Is this just a common expression? I don't get it.
The answer is: "Le gendre" in French means "The son-in-law". Since he is talking about Legendre transformations, he made that joke. I only understood because I speak French.

Patrick
arivero
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Aug24-14, 10:22 PM
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Also, it is almost an expression... in Spanish. In this language, "brother-in-law wisdom" refers to the tipical chit-chat conversation in family meetings, such as the ones in Xmas, where usually there is a "brother-in-law", a "cuņado", who pretends to know about everything. Funny coincidence.
haushofer
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Aug25-14, 02:05 AM
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Quote Quote by nrqed View Post
The answer is: "Le gendre" in French means "The son-in-law". Since he is talking about Legendre transformations, he made that joke. I only understood because I speak French.

Patrick
Fantastic :')
mal4mac
#7
Aug25-14, 03:10 AM
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In the UK the "mother-in-law" joke is a standard for comedians, the basic idea being that mother-in-law always thinks son-in-law is an idiot. So I would read "wisdom of the son-in-law" as being ironic.

Aren't QFT textbooks hard enough without making obscure jokes? I guess it's all part of the weeding out process...


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