Register to reply

(why) is an electron indestructible?

by bobie
Tags: electron, indestructible
Share this thread:
MikeGomez
#19
Apr15-14, 06:32 AM
MikeGomez's Avatar
P: 211
Quote Quote by bobie View Post
BTW, why cannot the missing energy in a proton (so small , anyway) cannot be acoounted for as extra KE ?
If you look at the second graphic in the article I linked to, you can see that based on the direction that the proton and electron take, momentum is not conserved. Fill in the blank for the missing momentum, and you have the neutrino.
bobie
#20
Apr15-14, 06:36 AM
PF Gold
P: 574
Quote Quote by MikeGomez View Post
quarks can never be isolated into single quarks in the first place.
.
So, the only elementary particle that can exist on their own (even for a short time) are leptons?
Can you tell me why leptons like muon are considered elementary although they are made up by really elementary particles like electrons and neutrinos?
bobie
#21
Apr15-14, 06:42 AM
PF Gold
P: 574
Quote Quote by MikeGomez View Post
Fill in the blank for the missing momentum, and you have the neutrino.
But the text says that missing mass is (up to 1/100 of a proton that is up to) 18 times an electron, whilst a neutrino has near-to-zero mass and energy a trillion times smaller, I suppose that corresponds also to momentum near-to-zero.
Moreover, if you increase the KE of a particle don't you authomatically increase momentum?
MikeGomez
#22
Apr15-14, 06:51 AM
MikeGomez's Avatar
P: 211
Quote Quote by bobie View Post
So, the only elementary particle that can exist on their own (even for a short time) are leptons?
Can you tell me why leptons like muon are considered elementary although they are made up by really elementary particles like electrons and neutrinos?
Muons are elementary. Although they decay into electrons and neutrinos, they are not made up of electrons and neutrinos.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Transition from localized electron to delocalized electron in the conjduction bandf Atomic, Solid State, Comp. Physics 3
How can 'indestructible' tardigrades[water bears] be eaten? Biology 4
Chirality, helicity, and electron-photon vertices, and polarised electron beams High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics 5
During electron ionisation, how does an electron beam transfer energy to a molecule? Classical Physics 1
Virtually indestructible materials, say adamantium. Special & General Relativity 5