Register to reply

Chlorine and bromine

by Colin Cheng
Tags: bromine, chlorine
Share this thread:
Colin Cheng
#1
Apr19-14, 09:03 PM
P: 10
Why can't chlorine and bromine form a covalent compound?


Colin
Phys.Org News Partner Chemistry news on Phys.org
Chemists create nanofibers using unprecedented new method
Nanostructured metal-oxide catalyst efficiently converts CO2 to methanol (w/ Video)
Researchers discover low-grade nonwoven cotton picks up 50 times own weight of oil
Prashasti
#2
Apr19-14, 11:54 PM
Prashasti's Avatar
P: 25
They are highly electronegative. They can only accept electrons, but they can't lose them, as this would require a lot of energy. They have positive ionisation enthalpy value and negative electron gain enthalpy.
Colin Cheng
#3
Apr20-14, 12:00 AM
P: 10
But chlorine, bromine, fluorine.... They form molecules which are covalent too... I mean like Cl2, Br2....


Colin

Prashasti
#4
Apr20-14, 12:08 AM
Prashasti's Avatar
P: 25
Chlorine and bromine

Yes, they do form covalent compounds, for example in CCl4, there are four covalent bonds, and in CH2Br, CH3Br, etc. I forgot that it's hard for them to lose electrons, but they can share them, as in Carbon tetrachloride.
Colin Cheng
#5
Apr20-14, 01:33 AM
P: 10
So it also requires a lot energy when they form CH3Br and CH2Br?


Colin
Borek
#6
Apr20-14, 02:35 AM
Admin
Borek's Avatar
P: 23,399
Quote Quote by Colin Cheng View Post
Why can't chlorine and bromine form a covalent compound?
They do, it is called bromine monochloride.
Colin Cheng
#7
Apr20-14, 04:12 AM
P: 10
Oh I see thanks!


Colin


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Uses of Bromine question. Biology, Chemistry & Other Homework 2
Oxygen and Bromine- Chemistry 0
Bromine solution vs. Bromine Chemistry 2
Manufacture of bromine Biology, Chemistry & Other Homework 6
Bromine from BCDMH Chemistry 7