How does a urinary catheter work?


by sameeralord
Tags: catheter, urinary, work
sameeralord
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#1
Jan29-14, 05:19 AM
P: 635
Hello everyone,



1) Now in this catheter, how does passing saline through the ballon port inflate the ballon. Are there pores at the end of the tube, which allows fluid to go into the balloon and inflate it.




1) What is the purpose of a 3 way catheter. If you want to clear out an infection I can understand you can send saline through one of the ports, but can't we do the same thing with a 2 way catheter. If we send saline through the ballon port in a 2 way catheter, wouldn't it fill the bladder after inflating the ballon and clear it.
2) Why does a 3 way catheter have 2 ballons as shown in pic.

Thanks :)
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Quote Quote by sameeralord View Post
Hello everyone,



1) Now in this catheter, how does passing saline through the ballon port inflate the ballon. Are there pores at the end of the tube, which allows fluid to go into the balloon and inflate it.




1) What is the purpose of a 3 way catheter. If you want to clear out an infection I can understand you can send saline through one of the ports, but can't we do the same thing with a 2 way catheter. If we send saline through the ballon port in a 2 way catheter, wouldn't it fill the bladder after inflating the ballon and clear it.
2) Why does a 3 way catheter have 2 ballons as shown in pic.

Thanks :)
The saline would only enter the bladder with the two way catheter after the balloon has burst. At that point there is no inflated balloon to keep the catheter in place.

The two way catheters have a tube within a tube. The three way has two tubes within a tube. The are called channels or lumens in medical speak.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foley_catheter

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fAkht172pbc


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