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Difference between 1D, 2D and 3D Flow

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amck
#1
Nov17-13, 10:14 AM
P: 3
Hey guys,

I'm new to this forum and was hoping to get a clear answer regarding the difference between 1D, 2D and 3D flows in hydraulics (ex. 2D Numerical Model...) ?

Thanks a bunch!
-A.
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boneh3ad
#2
Nov18-13, 07:49 PM
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It usually refers to the number spatial (or time) dimensions over which the flow variables vary in a given situation or problem.
amck
#3
Nov21-13, 09:47 AM
P: 3
Thanks for the response! So if you say 2D flow - it's the flow in a plane whereas 1D would be linear?

boneh3ad
#4
Nov21-13, 10:00 AM
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Difference between 1D, 2D and 3D Flow

Pretty much, though a 1D flow would be awfully uninteresting. A 2-D flow may also arise if, say, the flow is axisymmetric.
amck
#5
Nov21-13, 10:26 AM
P: 3
Fair enough. What kind of "real-life" flow would be considered axisymmetric?
boneh3ad
#6
Nov21-13, 06:42 PM
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The flow around a cone at zero angle of attack, the flow around the Apollo space capsule if it is at zero angle of attack the flow around the front end of a missile, the flow around a non-rotating sphere (in the Stokes limit), and the flow out of a rocket engine would all be examples of axisymmetric flows.


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