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Metals and semiconductors at high bias

by elionix
Tags: bias, metals, semiconductors
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elionix
#1
Mar29-13, 12:08 PM
P: 15
Hello,

Is there a well known theory on how metals and semiconductors should behave, electrically, while under a high voltage bias? Say, 2-3V? For example, how does the conductivity change as a function of voltage bias as we go from the low bias regime into high bias? Is there a linear dependence or is it described by a power law?

Thank you!
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marcusl
#2
Mar29-13, 01:16 PM
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
P: 2,081
Your question is unclear. Are you talking about devices? Which ones? What does it mean to have a "metal under bias"?
elionix
#3
Mar29-13, 01:22 PM
P: 15
Not devices, just a metal connected by source drain electrodes, for example.

Take a 1um diameter copper wire and sweep the potential from 0V to 3V. Will the current have a linear dependence on voltage? What about a semiconductor?

For example, theory wise, the dependence of current on temperature can be described by the Bloch Gruneisen relationship, but I was hoping for more insight on current dependence on voltage.

elionix
#4
Mar30-13, 03:38 PM
P: 15
Metals and semiconductors at high bias

does my question make sense?
marcusl
#5
Mar30-13, 08:29 PM
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
P: 2,081
Yes, but I'm not familiar enough with Bloch Gruniesen relations, etc. to answer it. I'm hoping someone else will chime in.


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