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Does the reactivity series of metals hold true for organic compounds?

by Yashbhatt
Tags: hold, metals, organic, reactivity, series
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Yashbhatt
#1
Mar17-14, 12:42 PM
P: 182
I've learnt that a more active metal displaces a less reactive one. So, according to the reactivity series Ca cannot displace Na but in he reaction given at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soap_scum
Na is displaced by Ca.
What is the reason for this exception?
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Adithyan
#2
Mar17-14, 12:59 PM
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P: 106
Quote Quote by Yashbhatt View Post
I've learnt that a more active metal displaces a less reactive one. So, according to the reactivity series Ca cannot displace Na but in he reaction given at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soap_scum
Na is displaced by Ca.
I am afraid you are wrong. ''Na'' is not replaced by Ca but Na+ is getting replaced by Ca+2. The reason for this displacement reaction is given by Fajan's rule. Fajan's rule states that lesser the size of cation, more stable is the compound/ionic salt. So here, size of calcium cation is lesser than sodium cation and hence greater product stability, thus the product.

Reactivity series applies to (Metal + Other compound) kind of reactions.

Eg: Na + H2O = NaOH + 1/2H2
Yashbhatt
#3
Mar21-14, 11:48 AM
P: 182
But if we have reactions like CuSO4 + Na → Na2SO4 + Cu
In such reactions we have Cu in the ion form i.e. Cu2+. So in this reaction aren't the cations of copper displaced?

Adithyan
#4
Mar21-14, 11:56 AM
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P: 106
Does the reactivity series of metals hold true for organic compounds?

Yeah. But, the one displacing it, i.e sodium is in the form of metal.
Borek
#5
Mar21-14, 02:01 PM
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Quote Quote by Yashbhatt View Post
But if we have reactions like CuSO4 + Na → Na2SO4 + Cu
In such reactions we have Cu in the ion form i.e. Cu2+. So in this reaction aren't the cations of copper displaced?
This is rather bad example. Better one will be

2AgNO3 + Cu → Cu(NO3)2 + 2Ag

or, in the net ionic form

2Ag+ + Cu → Cu2+ + 2Ag


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