charged particle interaction


by Crazymechanic
Tags: charged, interaction, particle
MikeGomez
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#19
Sep28-13, 07:04 AM
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Maybe you are thinking of something like a large positively charged sphere, with an enclosed smaller neutral sphere located in the center. Now if we put positively charged particles inside, they (the free positively charged particles) will repel from the positive charge of the outer shell, but they will not be able to reach the center, and so they will be pressed against one another.

So come to think of it, I guess my answer in post #13 “it can’t be done” is not completely correct. I was thinking in terms of only a few particles in the center of the sphere, and they would tend towards the center where the charges are balanced.

However if you have trillions of these particles, then (even without a neutral sphere barrier in the center), not all of the particles will occupy the center of the sphere, and there will be a pressure applied to the particles which have a non-zero distance from the center.

As to what happens to them when you press them together, I have no idea.

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About your question in post #1 regarding how the self field of a charge is affected, I don’t if much is known about that, but I think you should post that question in the “High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics” section. You might get some interesting replies.
Crazymechanic
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#20
Sep28-13, 01:12 PM
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I think many of the people viewing that part of PF are also checking this one.
As for the sphere and what you say , are you sure about that because a sphere has no net field inside of it as all the charge resides on the outer surface so will those particles feel anything being inside?

Well even if they would that is just playing around to bring things into play for real we would have to use both positive and negative potentials.
Drakkith
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#21
Sep28-13, 05:49 PM
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Quote Quote by MikeGomez View Post
Maybe you are thinking of something like a large positively charged sphere, with an enclosed smaller neutral sphere located in the center. Now if we put positively charged particles inside, they (the free positively charged particles) will repel from the positive charge of the outer shell, but they will not be able to reach the center, and so they will be pressed against one another.
I don't think this is true.

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu...ic/potsph.html

The electric field inside a conducting sphere is zero, so the potential remains constant at the value it reaches at the surface:
MikeGomez
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#22
Sep29-13, 06:32 AM
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Quote Quote by Drakkith View Post
I don't think this is true.

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu...ic/potsph.html

The electric field inside a conducting sphere is zero, so the potential remains constant at the value it reaches at the surface:
Ok, but if the sphere is non-conducting, there is a varying potential inside the sphere. Yes?
Drakkith
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#23
Sep29-13, 06:37 AM
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Quote Quote by MikeGomez View Post
Ok, but if the sphere is non-conducting, there is a varying potential inside the sphere. Yes?
I don't know, but if it's non conducting how the heck did you charge it in the first place?


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