Software to write Scientific Papers


by brentd49
Tags: papers, scientific, software, write
brentd49
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#1
Nov17-05, 09:00 PM
P: 74
I know there has to be a program better than Microsoft Word. When I try to move images/graphs around in MS Word they jump around all over the place. I end up having to reformat a paper 20 times because everytime I add a image, it effects the whole paper.

Or if MS Word is popular how do you control it from being random. I tried including tables, but to no avail.

What do scientist and engineers use to write papers and how do they include mathematical symbols into their papers? Is latex the most popular for script writing?

I was surprised google didn't give me an answer. So I'm counting on you guys to relieve my headache.
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Pengwuino
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#2
Nov17-05, 09:21 PM
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MathType allows you to put formulas into Word documents. Also, you can make images seperate from the text so that whatever you do to the picture's size or position, it won't effect the typing. I really forget how to do it though unfortunately... but it has something to do with putting a picture "behind" the text.
primal schemer
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#3
Nov18-05, 05:19 AM
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Most people I know (including myself) use LaTeX, it really is a great way to write papers.
Basically it takes away all of the formatting and does it for you, so you won't ever have to move images or tables around.

The only minor quibbles I have is that it can be awkward at first to put tables in (but once you've done it once or twice its ok), and pictures have to be in .eps format (or at least I havn't figured out a way to put jpegs etc. in)

It may take a couple of days to get used too, but it's well worth it.

PS

ComputerGeek
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#4
Nov18-05, 06:57 AM
P: 534

Software to write Scientific Papers


Quote Quote by Pengwuino
MathType allows you to put formulas into Word documents. Also, you can make images seperate from the text so that whatever you do to the picture's size or position, it won't effect the typing. I really forget how to do it though unfortunately... but it has something to do with putting a picture "behind" the text.
you make a text box and then insert the picture in the text box and then turn the text box into a frame.

LaTeX is much nicer to work with however.
ComputerGeek
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#5
Nov18-05, 06:58 AM
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Quote Quote by primal schemer
Most people I know (including myself) use LaTeX, it really is a great way to write papers.
Basically it takes away all of the formatting and does it for you, so you won't ever have to move images or tables around.

The only minor quibbles I have is that it can be awkward at first to put tables in (but once you've done it once or twice its ok), and pictures have to be in .eps format (or at least I havn't figured out a way to put jpegs etc. in)

It may take a couple of days to get used too, but it's well worth it.

PS
the graphix package allows you to use png (which is what I use)
masudr
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#6
Nov18-05, 09:05 AM
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I don't like reading papers not written in LaTeX. If you're a windows user then use MiKTeX if GNU/Linux (or some other UNIX variety) you've probably already got the necessary packages.
Pengwuino
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#7
Nov20-05, 01:51 AM
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How do you use Latex to make entire reports however. I thought it was only good for writing equations.
dduardo
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#8
Nov20-05, 08:16 AM
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You use styles and classes for the the look of the entire report. If your publishing in magazines like ACM or IEEE they actually provide these files on their webpage.

This is the program I use: http://www.lyx.org/
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#9
Nov20-05, 10:35 AM
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The latest (free) OpenOffice release has an awesome math tool. I tried it, really simple to use and really cool.
You can find out more about it here:
http://www.openoffice.org/product/math.html
ComputerGeek
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#10
Nov20-05, 12:20 PM
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Quote Quote by Pengwuino
How do you use Latex to make entire reports however. I thought it was only good for writing equations.
LaTeX is a typesetting macro language for the TeX typesetting language.

it is used for equations because it is so good at it, but you can use it for anything you like, from Slides to resumes to reports (something it is very good at using its citation tools)
franznietzsche
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#11
Nov20-05, 01:34 PM
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LaTeX is by far the best. Don't use MS Word for these sorts of things. For starters, you can't even save directly to pdf. LaTeX is much easier to use, just harder to learn. Especially if you have documents with more than a trivial number of equations, figures with captions, etc. Things like writing in columns are automatically take care of if you specify colums. Images can be rotated easily, footnotes are much simpler. But it is somewhat difficult to learn.

Images to not necesarily have to be in eps. Normal ps works fine sometimes (in the windows world these may seem like weird image files to use, but they're really the most logical on other systems(well they would be on windows too, but nothing is done logically there), since you can just print any image to a file instead of a printer, which creates a .ps file, and you can then convert that to eps if necessary. The single standard makes life simpler.
graphic7
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#12
Nov20-05, 01:48 PM
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LaTeX is also the most portable solution. I haven't seen too many platforms that don't have a LaTeX port of some kind -- even something obscure like Plan 9 has one. So, if you want to learn something that you can take and use on any platform, LaTeX is the way to go.
ZapperZ
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#13
Nov20-05, 04:06 PM
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Quote Quote by brentd49
I know there has to be a program better than Microsoft Word. When I try to move images/graphs around in MS Word they jump around all over the place. I end up having to reformat a paper 20 times because everytime I add a image, it effects the whole paper.
Or if MS Word is popular how do you control it from being random. I tried including tables, but to no avail.
What do scientist and engineers use to write papers and how do they include mathematical symbols into their papers? Is latex the most popular for script writing?
I was surprised google didn't give me an answer. So I'm counting on you guys to relieve my headache.
Keep in mind that what scientists write for their manuscript may not be the same typeset document that you get when it is finally published. The publishers will do their own typesetting and have their own requirements on the format of the submitted manuscript.

Physical Review journals, for example accept Word and LaTex documents. They have templates for Word, and their own style document for LaTex (RevTex) that one can download from their websites. These templates are meant as a guide for the authors to judge the length of their papers (something one may need to know the publication cost, and for PRL since there's a page number limit).

In any case, typically, figures and tables are usually grouped at the very end of the manuscript, not inserted into the document (the editors will do this themselves). Mathematical equations are typeset in LaTex, or if one uses Word, using Equation Editor. Just don't be confused into thinking that what you see in the final version of the published paper is what we submit.

Zz.
Moonbear
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#14
Nov20-05, 06:27 PM
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Quote Quote by ZapperZ
Keep in mind that what scientists write for their manuscript may not be the same typeset document that you get when it is finally published. The publishers will do their own typesetting and have their own requirements on the format of the submitted manuscript.
Physical Review journals, for example accept Word and LaTex documents. They have templates for Word, and their own style document for LaTex (RevTex) that one can download from their websites. These templates are meant as a guide for the authors to judge the length of their papers (something one may need to know the publication cost, and for PRL since there's a page number limit).
In any case, typically, figures and tables are usually grouped at the very end of the manuscript, not inserted into the document (the editors will do this themselves). Mathematical equations are typeset in LaTex, or if one uses Word, using Equation Editor. Just don't be confused into thinking that what you see in the final version of the published paper is what we submit.
Zz.
I was starting to wonder if physicists had to jump through hoops that biologists don't! I write all my manuscripts in Word. Most of the journals I submit to have a PDF converter right on their submission website, so I just upload the Word document, and they do the conversion to PDF for review. Figures are usually done in a separate software; in my case, often PhotoShop or Excel, depending on whether it's an image or graph, and saved as a format compatible with the publisher's website again. Read the instructions to authors! A manuscript is formatted very differently from the final published version to make the review/editing process easier (such as double spacing and including line numbers).

I do know what you're talking about with trying to embed figures within a Word document though. When I prepare grant proposals, I need to do that to show the preliminary data, and Word can be really picky sometimes. I find it's easiest to just stick all the figures at the end and then move them to the right location after everything else is typed. When you insert the pictures, you have to go into the advanced options to adjust the placement, text wrapping, overlap, etc., or else it will really screw up your formatting if left to the default settings.
exequor
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#15
Nov20-05, 07:27 PM
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Quote Quote by primal schemer
Most people I know (including myself) use LaTeX, it really is a great way to write papers.
Basically it takes away all of the formatting and does it for you, so you won't ever have to move images or tables around.

The only minor quibbles I have is that it can be awkward at first to put tables in (but once you've done it once or twice its ok), and pictures have to be in .eps format (or at least I havn't figured out a way to put jpegs etc. in)

It may take a couple of days to get used too, but it's well worth it.

PS
if you do a:
\usepackage[pdftex]{graphicx}

then something like:
\includegraphics{sample.png}
...would allow you to include jpeg, png, etc. I don't think that .gif works though.
ZapperZ
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#16
Nov20-05, 07:32 PM
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Quote Quote by Moonbear
I was starting to wonder if physicists had to jump through hoops that biologists don't!
How do you think I keep myself this limber?

:)

Since I submit most of my work to the Physical Review family of journals, they're the ones I'm most familiar with. So I tend to use them as the prime examples since they publish the largest number of physics articles per month of any physics organization in the world. Their format calls for figures only in PS or EPS format submitted as separate files for each figures, whereas the text documents should be in LaTex (prefered) or Word. When you do this, you get a discount in the publication charges.

The editors typically reformat these and send the pdf files to the reviwers. These are further typeset when accepted into the familiar double-columned Phys. Rev. (or Phys. Rev. Lett.) format.

So software-wise, one has a lot of freedom to use whatever one wishes to do the figures, as long as they are finally saved as EPS or PS format.

Zz.
robphy
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#17
Nov20-05, 08:26 PM
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Quote Quote by Moonbear
I was starting to wonder if physicists had to jump through hoops that biologists don't! I write all my manuscripts in Word. Most of the journals I submit to have a PDF converter right on their submission website, so I just upload the Word document, and they do the conversion to PDF for review. Figures are usually done in a separate software; in my case, often PhotoShop or Excel, depending on whether it's an image or graph, and saved as a format compatible with the publisher's website again.
Word, Photoshop, Excel... are not free. Word and Excel files are generally binary, as opposed to text-based (which is more easily archived and searched for its scientific content).... not to mention that nasty macros, virii, and possibly unintentionally hidden data might lurk within them.

LaTeX, as has been mentioned, is freely available on numerous platforms and operating systems.

Some related reading:
http://arxiv.org/help/submit#text
and
http://arxiv.org/help/faq/whytex
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Nov20-05, 08:39 PM
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I'd like to reiterate that OpenOffice (www.openoffice.org) has a math tool that does this. It's completely free (the whole package) and quite cool, give it a try, i thought it was nice, the interface is nice too, which IMO is more productive and easy to use than a markup.


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