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What makes a psychopath?

by Carlos Hernandez
Tags: makes, psychopath
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Carlos Hernandez
#1
Dec18-03, 04:04 AM
P: 175
What makes a psychopath?

By Caroline Ryan
BBC News Online health staff

Many people tell the odd white lie - taking a day off "sick" or halving the amount they spend on a shopping trip.
But most feel a little bit guilty about the deception.

Scientists have now found that twinge of conscience can be seen in increased activity in the brain.

Complete text at http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3116662.stm
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adrenaline
#2
Dec18-03, 04:29 AM
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P: 274
Interesting that psychopaths lack this increased activity. it takes absolutely no effort for a psycopath to lie.
mikelus
#3
Dec21-03, 09:44 AM
P: 96
Lack of love and appreciation and a misunderstanding of their engenius.

selfAdjoint
#4
Dec21-03, 11:20 AM
Emeritus
PF Gold
P: 8,147
What makes a psychopath?

But the difficulty of lying comes from neural interaction in the frontal cortex. Put this together with the UCLA twin study that showed grey matter in the frontal cortex is correlated with IQ and with Spearman's g. What do you get?

Are low IQ people systematically at risk for psychopathic disorders
Jenn_ucsb
#5
Apr1-04, 07:48 PM
P: 20
I hope its not splitting hairs, but the term "psychopath" is passe. Current research studying individuals with the traits I believe you are referring to is done in the field of personality reseach, and the disorder is now referred to as Antisocial Personality Disorder.
selfAdjoint
#6
Apr1-04, 08:51 PM
Emeritus
PF Gold
P: 8,147
One place I read that sociopath was a term sociologists invented so they wouldn't have to write SOB.
Jenn_ucsb
#7
Apr1-04, 09:33 PM
P: 20
Here are the diagnostic criteria for Antisocial PD (DSM-IV-TR 301.22):
"A. A pervasive pattern of diregard for and violation of the rights of others occuring since age 15 years, as indicated by three (or more) of the following:
(1) failure to conform to social norms with respect to lawful behaviors such as indicated by repeatedly performing acts that are grounds for arrest
(2) decietfulness, as indicated by repeated lying, use of aliases, or conning others for personal profit or pleasure
(3) impulsivity or failure to plan ahead
(4) irritability and aggressiveness, as indicated by repeated physical fights or assaults
(5) reckless disregard for the safety of self or others
(6) consistent irresponsibility, as indicated by repeated failure to sustain consistent work behavior or honor financial obligations
(7) lack of remorse, as indicated by being indifferent to or rationalizing having hurt, mistreated, or stolen from another
B. The individual is at least age 18 years.
C. There is evidence of Conduct Disorder (see DSM IV-TR pg. 98) with onset before age 15 years.
D. The occurance of antisocial behavior is not exclusively during the course of Schizophrenia or a Manic Episode."

Of course, this is not the only definition, but it is by far the most accepted, and most widely researched.
Jin314159
#8
Apr1-04, 09:39 PM
P: n/a
Quote Quote by Jenn_ucsb
Here are the diagnostic criteria for Antisocial PD (DSM-IV-TR 301.22):
"A. A pervasive pattern of diregard for and violation of the rights of others occuring since age 15 years, as indicated by three (or more) of the following:
(1) failure to conform to social norms with respect to lawful behaviors such as indicated by repeatedly performing acts that are grounds for arrest
(2) decietfulness, as indicated by repeated lying, use of aliases, or conning others for personal profit or pleasure
(3) impulsivity or failure to plan ahead
(4) irritability and aggressiveness, as indicated by repeated physical fights or assaults
(5) reckless disregard for the safety of self or others
(6) consistent irresponsibility, as indicated by repeated failure to sustain consistent work behavior or honor financial obligations
(7) lack of remorse, as indicated by being indifferent to or rationalizing having hurt, mistreated, or stolen from another
B. The individual is at least age 18 years.
C. There is evidence of Conduct Disorder (see DSM IV-TR pg. 98) with onset before age 15 years.
D. The occurance of antisocial behavior is not exclusively during the course of Schizophrenia or a Manic Episode."

Of course, this is not the only definition, but it is by far the most accepted, and most widely researched.
Judging by the criteria given, I think it would safe to classify myself as a psychopath.
Jenn_ucsb
#9
Apr1-04, 09:48 PM
P: 20
Do you need a referral? J/K
Implicit in any psychiatric diagnosis is disruption in the life of the client, or in the lives of those around them. I assume you have nothing to fear.
Adam
#10
Apr2-04, 10:43 AM
P: 454
Quote Quote by Jenn_ucsb
I hope its not splitting hairs, but the term "psychopath" is passe. Current research studying individuals with the traits I believe you are referring to is done in the field of personality reseach, and the disorder is now referred to as Antisocial Personality Disorder.
Psychopath, sociopath, antisocial personality type, all the exact same thing, at least so my psych textbook tells me.
Jenn_ucsb
#11
Apr2-04, 05:24 PM
P: 20
They all describe the same set of people. Correct. But, since Anitsocial PD was created in the DSM, use of the terms psychopath and sociopath have been abandoned by researchers, or clinical psych researchers anyway. Dyssocial personality disorder has also been used to describe this disorder. Do a little experiment...Google "psychopath" and look at the kinds of websites that come up (I got MSN, Amazon, and a lot of random junk). Now Google "Antisocial personality disorder", then you tell me which one is the clinical term, and which one is the layman's term.
Adam
#12
Apr3-04, 05:49 AM
P: 454
Well, since my textbook was published after the first DSM, and uses all three terms interchangably...
Jenn_ucsb
#13
Apr3-04, 10:49 AM
P: 20
And we all know that there are no poorly-worded textbooks, right kids?
Use whatever terminology you like, but your textbook is not a reference for researchers and academicians....the DSM IV is. I'll leave it at that.
Adam
#14
Apr3-04, 11:52 AM
P: 454
Sorry "kids", that is incorrect. The DSM is only a diagnosis manual. It is not a resource for researchers or academics. It is a resource for psychological analysis of patients. It does not contain information sufficient for any sort of research other than using it as a reference for categorising symptoms.
Jenn_ucsb
#15
Apr3-04, 03:29 PM
P: 20
How do you suppose researchers would study a disorder if they did not have objective, standardized criteria to decide whether or not a subject has a specific diagnosis? This is one of the major purposes of the DSM.
Adam
#16
Apr4-04, 06:51 AM
P: 454
Read the DSM. It doesn't do anything at all for research. For research, you want to study chemistry, surveys of social behaviours, neurology, et cetera.
Janitor
#17
Apr4-04, 12:56 PM
Sci Advisor
P: 1,189
I know you guys are talking about me.
Adam
#18
Apr4-04, 09:57 PM
P: 454
Yes, we are...


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