Chi: A real force?


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Tags: force, real
SoleKundalite
SoleKundalite is offline
#145
Apr18-08, 05:23 AM
P: 24
womenshealthmag.com/health/adrenaline

Adrenaline on Tap
It makes you faster, stronger--and ballsier. Now research shows it can help you battle the biggest health-suck of all: stress. Bring it on
SoleKundalite
SoleKundalite is offline
#146
Apr18-08, 05:27 AM
P: 24
findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1590/is_n4_v53/ai_18839104

thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=428

answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=267285

Go ahead and try to obtain this "energy" ability to make future physical goals much easier and obtain certain health benefits (like antiarthritic effects). But there is also the possibility that you may become insane or die. That'll mean a few less annoying skeptics left to annoy me. :-)
SoleKundalite
SoleKundalite is offline
#147
Apr18-08, 05:52 AM
P: 24
General Endocrinology

Hypothalamus/Pituitary I/II

David Abbott
Description Hypothalamus, anterior and posterior pituitary. Portal flow, Concept of releasing hormones. List hormones, describe POMC and derivative peptides, control release of ACTH. Feedback control of release and Circadian Rhythm. TRH/dopamine and Prolactin Secretion.

Hypothalamus/Pituitary III/IV
David Abbott
LH/FSH, GnRH, steroid feedback control/ovarian cycle overview from hypothalamus/pituitary point of view. (Includes Inhibin/activin feedback)

Adrenal I (Cortex)

Ian Bird
Outline steroid synthetic pathways and zonal function, Hormone control zonal function by ACTH/AII/K+/5HT, Outline congenital adrenal hyperplasia, Mechanistic basis for Adrenarche/menopause in humans/primates.

Adrenal II (Medulla)

Ian Bird
Medullary structure/function/control adrenaline release. Outline evidence for adrenal cortical innervation/hypothalamic reflex. Acute vs chronic stress responses (adrenaline vs steroid).


==>



"Adrenaline increases the rate of cycling of crossbridges in rat cardiac muscle as measured by pseudo-random binary noise-modulated perturbation analysis
JF Hoh, GH Rossmanith, LJ Kwan and AM Hamilton
Department of Physiology, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.

The mechanism of action of adrenaline on cardiac contractility in rat papillary muscles containing V1 and V3 isomyosins was analyzed during barium-activated contractures at 25 degrees C by frequency domain analysis using pseudo-random binary noise-modulated perturbations. The analysis characterizes a frequency (fmin) at which dynamic stiffness of a muscle is a minimum, a parameter that reflects the rate of cycling of crossbridges. We have previously shown that fmin for V1- and V3- containing papillary muscles were 2.1 +/- 0.2 Hz (mean +/- SD) (n = 10) and 1.1 +/- 0.2 Hz (n = 8), respectively, and that these values were independent of the level of activation. The present study's goal was to determine whether the inotropic action of adrenaline was associated with an increased rate of crossbridge cycling. The results show that a saturating dose of adrenaline increased fmin in V1 hearts by 49 +/- 2% (n = 11). The action on V3 hearts was significantly less; the increase in fmin was 26 +/- 2% (n = 6). The increase in fmin for V1 hearts was shown to be sensitive to the beta-blocking agent propranolol. These results suggest that adrenaline significantly increases the rate of crossbridge cycling by a beta-receptor-mediated mechanism. We conclude that the increased contractility of the heart in the presence of adrenaline arises not only from more complete activation of the contractile proteins but also from the increased rate at which each crossbridge can transduce energy."

Taken from: ==>circres.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/62/3/452
seycyrus
seycyrus is offline
#148
Apr18-08, 08:07 AM
P: 184
Quote Quote by SoleKundalite View Post
If I do 100 reps of a lighter weight, like 20 lbs, I do it for toning, not necessarily to get stronger or bigger. I'm not so much looking to get big but to burn fat and get toned at the moment.
Get *toned*? What does an *untoned* muscle fiber look like? You're using terminology from infomercials.

Quote Quote by SoleKundalite View Post
do one and have to take some time to rest. Lifting weights has been far easier than ever before almost to the point of boredom.
Maybe you should try something revolutionary... You know, like increasing the weight.

Quote Quote by SoleKundalite View Post
Forearm hairs standing/goosebumps are the key feature to identify those who can release this Chi. I guess I'd better take a photo to show you that it is possible.
A picture of goosebumps don't prove squat.
seycyrus
seycyrus is offline
#149
Apr18-08, 08:08 AM
P: 184
Quote Quote by SoleKundalite View Post
womenshealthmag.com/health/adrenaline
Adrenaline on Tap
It makes you faster, stronger
You said it didn't make you stronger, only increased your stamina.
seycyrus
seycyrus is offline
#150
Apr18-08, 08:12 AM
P: 184
Quote Quote by SoleKundalite View Post
"Adrenaline increases the rate of cycling of crossbridges in rat cardiac muscle as measured by pseudo-random binary noise-modulated perturbation analysis
JF Hoh, GH Rossmanith, LJ Kwan and AM Hamilton
Department of Physiology, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.

The mechanism of action of adrenaline on cardiac contractility in rat papillary muscles containing V1 and V3 isomyosins was analyzed during barium-activated contractures at 25 degrees C by frequency domain analysis using pseudo-random binary noise-modulated perturbations. The analysis characterizes a frequency (fmin) at which dynamic stiffness of a muscle is a minimum, a parameter that reflects the rate of cycling of crossbridges. We have previously shown that fmin for V1- and V3- containing papillary muscles were 2.1 +/- 0.2 Hz (mean +/- SD) (n = 10) and 1.1 +/- 0.2 Hz (n = 8), respectively, and that these values were independent of the level of activation. The present study's goal was to determine whether the inotropic action of adrenaline was associated with an increased rate of crossbridge cycling. The results show that a saturating dose of adrenaline increased fmin in V1 hearts by 49 +/- 2% (n = 11). The action on V3 hearts was significantly less; the increase in fmin was 26 +/- 2% (n = 6). The increase in fmin for V1 hearts was shown to be sensitive to the beta-blocking agent propranolol. These results suggest that adrenaline significantly increases the rate of crossbridge cycling by a beta-receptor-mediated mechanism. We conclude that the increased contractility of the heart in the presence of adrenaline arises not only from more complete activation of the contractile proteins but also from the increased rate at which each crossbridge can transduce energy."

Taken from: ==>circres.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/62/3/452
And how, exactly, do you think that article reinforces what you have been saying?
Pythagorean
Pythagorean is offline
#151
Apr18-08, 09:24 AM
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P: 4,180
Quote Quote by Ivan Seeking View Post
I know an engineer who will swear that the technique works, but he doesn't think there is anything mystical involved. However, when he started to explain to me what he saw as the prosaic explanation for why this works, it sounded like a real stretch to me. In fact, it sounded like nonsense to me.

At one point he described how one can build up waves of energy. For example, if one is to throw a right punch, the waves might travel between the right fist and the rear-most foot. The most proficient experts can allegedly quickly produce seven waves, I think it was, which enables an incredibly powerful punch. As a black belt, my buddy could only get to three waves or so.

Allegedly one adds power by piling up waves such that they interfere constructively, if you will, at the fist, at the exact moment of the punch. Of course the question is: Waves of what? He thinks this is something like a mechanical wave traveling along the muscles, but that doesn't make any sense to me. True believers say it is the Chi energy. At the least, it appears that using and practicing this technique mentally, one can dramatically improve the effectiveness of a punch.
I am a prior martial artist and just about to graduate with a physics degree. I belive the "wave" that most people describe is related to an actual muscle tensing propagation that starts at the feet and goes up through the hips (where a lot of power comes from). As a martial artist, I can tell this is more powerful (I mean, obviously, you have to use the ground to push yourself forward anyway, so a lot of punching power already automatically comes from you pushing off of the friction bond between your feet and the ground). By following through with your hips, you're putting your whole upper body weight into the punch, and of course, you have to throw the fist out, so it's very natural to feel like you're muscles are a propagating wave..

I don't, however, think there's multiple waves. Perhaps they psychologically prep themselves for the physical wave-like motion of the muscles by doing a few imaginary runs first or something. or do a small muscle propagation (like a warm-up swing).

Other than that, I've noticed a lot of sensory can be thermodynamic and optical (with my eyes closed, I can sense somebody putting their hand near my body because I can feel the heat, or if they step in front of light it still dims what photons get through my eyelids. Or sometimes people will block off acoustic radiation and you don't often consciously recognize it, but your ears picks it up and your brain sends a little red flag up.

I had a sensei who claimed our "comfort bubble" was our energy/sensory field. I suppose that sort of makes sense in the way that you tend to notice when people are inside your comfort bubble, but I think it all comes down to our five, well-known senses working on a more subtle level.
SoleKundalite
SoleKundalite is offline
#152
Apr21-08, 06:45 AM
P: 24
It can make your stronger, as in do more reps of a particular weight than normally. Lately I've become better at channeling it allowing me to perform even better at bench press. But it makes more significant strides in giving you so much stamina you barely sweat while all the other guys are sweating like hogs.

[A picture of goosebumps don't prove squat.]
seycyrus
seycyrus is offline
#153
Apr21-08, 08:04 AM
P: 184
Quote Quote by SoleKundalite View Post
It can make your stronger, as in do more reps of a particular weight than normally. Lately I've become better at channeling it allowing me to perform even better at bench press. .
How many times can you put up 315?

Quote Quote by SoleKundalite View Post
But it makes more significant strides in giving you so much stamina you barely sweat while all the other guys are sweating like hogs.
Because they are working harder than you. They are curling 45s for 8-10 reps, and you are curling 30 oz for 1000 reps. Do you sweat from chewing bubble gum? Imagine the CHI you must be unleashing to allow yourself to all those reps with the bubbleicious!

Explain why and how adrenaline modifies the body's cooling response.

Noone is disputing that adrenaline has certain effects on the body. What is being disputed is your CHI-adrenaline.
JayR
JayR is offline
#154
Apr22-08, 03:56 AM
P: 40
Yep, a whole lot of training and the never ending ability of people to underestimate the capabilities of the human body.
Poop-Loops
Poop-Loops is offline
#155
Apr22-08, 10:16 AM
P: 863
Quote Quote by SoleKundalite View Post
It can make your stronger, as in do more reps of a particular weight than normally.
Everything I've read on weight lifting and strength training tells me you are wrong.

You do NOT gain strength by lifting small weights a lot of times.

You gain strength by lifting large weights, even if it's only a few times.

Can you do this? http://youtube.com/watch?v=mcM_SCp2KHA
striker5585
striker5585 is offline
#156
Apr23-08, 10:31 AM
P: 8
lifting small weights with more reps tone and lifting heavy weights with less reps builds strength.
Poop-Loops
Poop-Loops is offline
#157
Apr23-08, 12:39 PM
P: 863
Quote Quote by striker5585 View Post
lifting small weights with more reps tone and lifting heavy weights with less reps builds strength.
Wrong.

Lifting small weights with more reps wastes time. Lifting heavy weights with less reps builds strength and muscle.

http://exercise.about.com/cs/weightloss/a/toning.htm
http://www.allspiritfitness.com/libr...ing_myth.shtml
http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/goulet5.htm
http://tcfitness-24.com/TCFitness-ti...PrintPost.html
SoleKundalite
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#158
Apr25-08, 06:16 AM
P: 24
Quote Quote by seycyrus View Post
How many times can you put up 315?



Because they are working harder than you. They are curling 45s for 8-10 reps, and you are curling 30 oz for 1000 reps. Do you sweat from chewing bubble gum? Imagine the CHI you must be unleashing to allow yourself to all those reps with the bubbleicious!

Explain why and how adrenaline modifies the body's cooling response.

Noone is disputing that adrenaline has certain effects on the body. What is being disputed is your CHI-adrenaline.

No, it's not because they're working harder than me. I've watched how they react and proceeded to use the same machine they did and used a weight that I felt was as heavy for me relative to the heavier weight they were using (these guys were much bigger and obviously lifted consistently for a much longer time period). If I see guys who seem to be similar in muscle content and workout consistency as myself we would obviously use similar weight for a comparisson. Other than that I can say my current performance has far exceeded my past normal abilities.

As far as benching 315, you are using ridiculous numbers for someone who has been in academia for quite a while and thus not spend much time at the gym consistently. But I can assure you that anyone who can summon this Chi/Adrenaline, say tomorrow, who can bench 315 today should be able to do more reps than he thought possible (maybe 10-25% more than what is normally possible without the adrenaline rushes... w/ lighter weights he should be able to increase reps even more relative to normal). He also won't feel like he's exerted himself much after using each station or routine.

I haven't researched anything w/ regard to hardly sweating. I think it has to do w/ my body not feeling like it's exerted itself as much. Lifting what a person of my stature/consistency/muscle content can at this moment has been by and far much easier than in the past as long as I shoot some rushes every 20-30 minutes.

Here's a little more about adrenaline power:
http://health.howstuffworks.com/adre....htm/printable
SoleKundalite
SoleKundalite is offline
#159
Apr25-08, 06:17 AM
P: 24
Quote Quote by Poop-Loops View Post
I have no interest in becoming a gargantuan, esp. since I'm under 6 feet.
SoleKundalite
SoleKundalite is offline
#160
Apr25-08, 06:19 AM
P: 24
Quote Quote by Poop-Loops View Post
Everything I've read on weight lifting and strength training tells me you are wrong.

You do NOT gain strength by lifting small weights a lot of times.

You gain strength by lifting large weights, even if it's only a few times.

Can you do this? http://youtube.com/watch?v=mcM_SCp2KHA
If you are able to do more reps by using the rushes of the max weight that you use for a certain routine then you are in essence stronger/more powerful than your normal self. Maybe your muscle isn't in actuality much stronger than normal but the adrenaline gives you like some extra internal power/strength to push the muscle beyond normal ability.
SoleKundalite
SoleKundalite is offline
#161
Apr25-08, 06:25 AM
P: 24
Quote Quote by Pythagorean View Post
I am a prior martial artist and just about to graduate with a physics degree. I belive the "wave" that most people describe is related to an actual muscle tensing propagation that starts at the feet and goes up through the hips (where a lot of power comes from). As a martial artist, I can tell this is more powerful (I mean, obviously, you have to use the ground to push yourself forward anyway, so a lot of punching power already automatically comes from you pushing off of the friction bond between your feet and the ground). By following through with your hips, you're putting your whole upper body weight into the punch, and of course, you have to throw the fist out, so it's very natural to feel like you're muscles are a propagating wave..

I don't, however, think there's multiple waves. Perhaps they psychologically prep themselves for the physical wave-like motion of the muscles by doing a few imaginary runs first or something. or do a small muscle propagation (like a warm-up swing).

Other than that, I've noticed a lot of sensory can be thermodynamic and optical (with my eyes closed, I can sense somebody putting their hand near my body because I can feel the heat, or if they step in front of light it still dims what photons get through my eyelids. Or sometimes people will block off acoustic radiation and you don't often consciously recognize it, but your ears picks it up and your brain sends a little red flag up.

I had a sensei who claimed our "comfort bubble" was our energy/sensory field. I suppose that sort of makes sense in the way that you tend to notice when people are inside your comfort bubble, but I think it all comes down to our five, well-known senses working on a more subtle level.
Adrenaline/Chi = fight of flight response/feeling like there's an energy field around you but iit's prob just the feeling of the goosebumps+forearm hairs standing on end and adrenaline/endorphins flowing. This has nothing to do w/ the punching power mechanism you are describing. As mentioned previously this adrenaline/Chi ability is extremely rare. I've been keeping my eyes peeled at various gyms (I feel like I'm cheating by using the energy hehehe) and still haven't found others like me. There are two energy healers that I will get in contact w/ soon who supposedly also have this ability.
seycyrus
seycyrus is offline
#162
Apr25-08, 08:24 AM
P: 184
Quote Quote by SoleKundalite View Post
No, it's not because they're working harder than me.
Yes it was.

Quote Quote by SoleKundalite View Post
I've watched how they react and proceeded to use the same machine they did and used a weight that I felt was as heavy for me relative to the heavier weight they were using
You "felt" it was as relatively heavy. That's subjective.

Quote Quote by SoleKundalite View Post
Other than that I can say my current performance has far exceeded my past normal abilities.
That's a benefit of working out, you get stronger. CHI has nothing to do with it.

Quote Quote by SoleKundalite View Post
As far as benching 315, you are using ridiculous numbers for someone who has been in academia for quite a while and thus not spend much time at the gym consistently.
Excuse me? I've had experiences with academia myself. Academia have as much free time as they require. The gym is on campus, a nice little walk near the place where you work. It's alot more convenient compared to someone who has to drive 30 minutes in heavy traffic and then hunt for a parking space near the gym.

The reason why you aren't that strong is because you haven't made the commitment to work out. Your "academia" excuse is just that, an excuse.

Btw, the reason why you aren't going to get any stronger is because you insist on doing 100s of reps with teeny weight.

Increase the poundage. See the results.

Quote Quote by SoleKundalite View Post
I haven't researched anything w/ regard to hardly sweating. I think it has to do w/ my body not feeling like it's exerted itself as much.
That's an illogical conclusion. Your body doesn't work this way.


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