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Rotation of electron

by georgie
Tags: electron, rotation
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georgie
#1
Nov4-06, 03:23 PM
P: n/a
When Feynman was at Cornell while eating lunch in the cafeteria he
observed a student throwing a plate and noticed that the blue school
logo spun around faster than the wobble of the plate. For the fun of it
he worked out the equation of motion which showed that if the wobble is
small the blue logo goes around twice as fast as the wobble. When asked
why he was doing this he responded, "It hasn't any use. I'm just
doing it for the fun of it."

Feynman: "and I started to play with this rotation, and the rotation
led me to a similar problem of the rotation of an electron according to
Dirac's equation, and that just led me back into quantum
electrodynamics, which was the problem I had been working on."
(From: No Ordinary Genius, The Illustrated Richard Feynman.
Christopher Sykes. Norton. 1994 p.72.)


This seems like it's related to spinors but I can't find any
reference to this "rotation" of the electron in any of my QFT
books. Any comments?
Georgie

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FrediFizzx
#2
Nov4-06, 03:24 PM
P: n/a
"georgie" <gderise@cox.net> wrote in message
news:1137349865.869887.94590@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
| When Feynman was at Cornell while eating lunch in the cafeteria he
| observed a student throwing a plate and noticed that the blue school
| logo spun around faster than the wobble of the plate. For the fun of
it
| he worked out the equation of motion which showed that if the wobble
is
| small the blue logo goes around twice as fast as the wobble. When
asked
| why he was doing this he responded, "It hasn't any use. I'm just
| doing it for the fun of it."
|
| Feynman: "and I started to play with this rotation, and the rotation
| led me to a similar problem of the rotation of an electron according
to
| Dirac's equation, and that just led me back into quantum
| electrodynamics, which was the problem I had been working on."
| (From: No Ordinary Genius, The Illustrated Richard Feynman.
| Christopher Sykes. Norton. 1994 p.72.)
|
|
| This seems like it's related to spinors but I can't find any
| reference to this "rotation" of the electron in any of my QFT
| books. Any comments?

I am sure he must be talking about the spin of the electron. But I
think this Hubius Helix topology in this article solves the problem
Feynman was working on,

"The Nature of the Electron"
http://www.arxiv.org/abs/physics/0512265

I also thought of this about two years ago to solve the electron spin
problem but we had to have a mechanism that would possible constrain or
"cause" the circular-like motion which led us to this,

http://www.vacuum-physics.com/QVC/qu...uum_charge.pdf
or postscript
http://www.vacuum-physics.com/QVC/qu...cuum_charge.ps

And then to this,

"Quantum Vacuum Charge and the New HyperCP Particle X"
http://www.arxiv.org/abs/physics/0601110

FrediFizzx
http://www.vacuum-physics.com

Charles Francis
#3
Nov4-06, 03:24 PM
P: n/a
Thus spake georgie <gderise@cox.net>
>When Feynman was at Cornell while eating lunch in the cafeteria he
>observed a student throwing a plate and noticed that the blue school
>logo spun around faster than the wobble of the plate. For the fun of it
>he worked out the equation of motion which showed that if the wobble is
>small the blue logo goes around twice as fast as the wobble. When asked
>why he was doing this he responded, "It hasn't any use. I'm just
>doing it for the fun of it."
>
>Feynman: "and I started to play with this rotation, and the rotation
>led me to a similar problem of the rotation of an electron according to
>Dirac's equation, and that just led me back into quantum
>electrodynamics, which was the problem I had been working on."
> (From: No Ordinary Genius, The Illustrated Richard Feynman.
>Christopher Sykes. Norton. 1994 p.72.)
>
>
>This seems like it's related to spinors but I can't find any
>reference to this "rotation" of the electron in any of my QFT
>books. Any comments?


He is talking of the property of the phase of the electron wave function
under rotation; phase rotates by half the amount of the rotation.

Regards

--
Charles Francis
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