What happens to lead then you overhead it beyond its melting point


by Jacquesl
Tags: lead, melting, overhead, point
chemisttree
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#19
Feb5-07, 10:37 AM
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Gokul,

Nope! I also failed to realize that if any distillation occurred, it would be the antimony that would distill out first and a lead-enriched residue would result. By my logic, it should have been softer rather than harder...
chemisttree
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#20
Feb7-07, 09:36 AM
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Jacquesl,

You have discovered the can liner. I'm sure that googling "steel can coating" will provide you an answer. The residue is interesting.... Ferromagnetic?

Maybe you have discovered a "buckycan" form of carbon!
Jacquesl
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#21
Feb7-07, 11:25 AM
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Yip I know it’s a can liner. I did a Google about 2 weeks ago to check out, what the stuff is, but did not found usable info.

Maybe you have discovered a "buckycan" form of carbon!
Lol, I’m not that sure man, it’s probably old news in NASA. but if found anything usable about my “burned up can liner” please let me know?
chemisttree
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#22
Feb7-07, 03:18 PM
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Well, since you ask...

What if the carbon on the inside of the can (post heat treatment) is a form of activated carbon that contains magnetic particles. An understanding of the genesis of these magnetic particles might have some use. If the carbon can be used as a decolorizing carbon, filtration would not be required since a simple magnet could remove the spent decolorizing carbon. Speeds up continuous chemical production operations...

If the mechanism of the soot generation were understood, soot generation in diesel motors might be made to produce slightly magnetic particles which could be removed from the oil by a magnet thereby increasing the service life of the oil filter and lengthing the service interval between oil changes. This is BIG stuff for companies that operate large fleets of vechicles and would be totally great for the environment since oil spills or improper disposal of used oil would be minimized.

Good luck with it.

To get you started, iron compounds, regardless of oxidation state, might be reduced to a magnetite type material during combustion in the presence of excess carbon, the reducing agent in this case.
chemisttree
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#23
Feb7-07, 03:49 PM
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It is not necessarily a ferromagnetic material. Paramagnetic materials are attracted to magnets as well. You might want to look up the magnetic susceptibility of some materials to find ones which would impart the properties you observed. Iron is a particularly strong one that is common. Copper is another.
DaveC426913
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#24
Feb7-07, 03:54 PM
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Should someone not be stepping in and saying "Jacquesl, wha the h*** are you doing playing with these things when you apparently don't have the expertise to do so. Among other dangers, the vapours off these things can be quite toxic. You could be poisoning yourself and possibly others."
Jacquesl
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#25
Feb7-07, 04:23 PM
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But what must the main purpose be, by making the soot/dirt, magnetic, to filter out the dirt/soot ?
I dint understand that picture so good yet

Dave, it’s not like I’m filling my room up with SO2 gasses, It’s just a can, man
chemisttree
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Feb7-07, 06:21 PM
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If you understood the process well enough, you could, for example, put an additive in diesel fuel that produced a magnetic soot particle. That particle would find its way into the oil and be removed by a magnet.

Activated carbon is difficult to remove by filtration and filter aid must be used. magnetic filtering would not require a filter or filter aid. There are many, many uses of magnetic activated carbon. Mercury removal in coal fired power plants, for example.
DaveC426913
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#27
Feb7-07, 07:02 PM
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Quote Quote by Jacquesl View Post
Dave, it’s not like I’m filling my room up with SO2 gasses, It’s just a can, man
I was concerned about lead vapour. The temps you're creating could liberate some elements that would normally be inert and harmless.
berkeman
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#28
Feb7-07, 11:46 PM
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Quote Quote by DaveC426913 View Post
I was concerned about lead vapour. The temps you're creating could liberate some elements that would normally be inert and harmless.
I agree with Dave about the safety aspect, which should have been brought up early in this thread by the OP, IMO. "Using my exhaust hood, I noticed..."

This thread is close to being locked. Any last constuctive posts from y'all?
Jacquesl
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#29
Feb8-07, 02:56 AM
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I also agree about the lead stuff. I didn’t know about lead vapor, will it be dangerous for people like me, then using “lead wire” I’m not sure what that called in Eng. It’s used to mount the parts with as soldier iron to the PC boards
Jacquesl
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Feb8-07, 03:16 AM
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Quote Quote by chemisttree View Post
If you understood the process well enough, you could, for example, put an additive in diesel fuel that produced a magnetic soot particle. That particle would find its way into the oil and be removed by a magnet.

Activated carbon is difficult to remove by filtration and filter aid must be used. magnetic filtering would not require a filter or filter aid. There are many, many uses of magnetic activated carbon. Mercury removal in coal fired power plants, for example.
I donít have a lot of experience with ICC engines, do you have a picture of that soot problem youíre talking about, and I donít understand what the story with the soot is. I donít know what soot is.
chemisttree
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#31
Feb8-07, 09:54 AM
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Quote Quote by chemisttree View Post
If you got your "lead" from wheel weights or lead acid batteries, the hard brittle stuff left over when you distill out the lead is antimony. Antimony is hard, silver to gray and brittle. It will cause contact dermatitis, conjunctivitus (pink eye), nasal ulceration. Bad JU JU! Keep it away from any of your hydrogen experiments since it will form extremely toxic, volatile hydrides.

Find the Merck Index at your local College library and make friends with it.

Just a note... I hope that when you are doing this kind of stuff you aren't inhaling or you are using a good hood. A garage with a few open doors really won't cut it.
Berkeman,

This sounds like a warning to me! The can soot stuff is probably better on its own thread though.
Jacquesl
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#32
Feb8-07, 10:26 AM
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Just to add in, my burned up lead does not, have a silvery color, it’s more like gray. its just brittle, but not so hard and, the volume of the lead also stay the same and thats it!
I totally agree with you chemisttree, this tread can we gladly locked, for what I feel!


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