Quantum Theory questions


by CathyLou
Tags: quantum, theory
CathyLou
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#1
Mar11-07, 05:57 AM
P: 173
Hiya.

I'm really stuck on the following questions and so any help would be really appeciated.

(a) A laser produces light of wavelength 632nm. Calculate the energy of the laser photons.

Speed = Wavelength x Frequency

3 x 108 = 632 x 10^-9 x f

f = 4.75 x 10^14 Hz

E = hf

E = 6.6 x 10^-34 x 4.75 x 10^14

E = 3.14 x 10^-19 J

(b) The laser has a power output of 100Mw. Calculate the number of photons released each second.

Thank you.

Cathy
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H_man
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#2
Mar11-07, 06:04 AM
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A Megawatt is a million watts.

A million watts is a million Joules per second.

You know how much energy each photon has...........

CathyLou
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#3
Mar11-07, 06:11 AM
P: 173
Quote Quote by H_man View Post
A Megawatt is a million watts.

A million watts is a million Joules per second.

You know how much energy each photon has...........

Okay. So, is the answer 3.18 x 10^24 photons per second?

Thanks for your help.

Cathy

CathyLou
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#4
Mar11-07, 07:50 AM
P: 173

Quantum Theory questions


I'm not sure how to do this one either. Could someone please help?

The photoelectric work function of a metal is 3eV and light with energy 5eV is shone onto the metal surface.

(a) Calculate the wavelength of a photon with energy 5eV.

(b) Calculate the maximum kinetic energy of the emitted photoelectrons, giving your answer in joules.


Thank you.

Cathy
H_man
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#5
Mar11-07, 08:17 AM
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The answer you calculated to your first question looks fine though I don't have a calculator to hand.

1)For part (a), perhaps you can tell me what is an electron volt?

2)For part (b)... what is the work function a measure of?

I know from the previous question that you already have the equations and knowledge to solve this if you can answer my 2 questions.
CathyLou
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#6
Mar11-07, 08:26 AM
P: 173
Quote Quote by H_man View Post
The answer you calculated to your first question looks fine though I don't have a calculator to hand.

1)For part (a), perhaps you can tell me what is an electron volt?

2)For part (b)... what is the work function a measure of?

I know from the previous question that you already have the equations and knowledge to solve this if you can answer my 2 questions.
1 eV is the energy transferred when an electron moves between two points separated by a p.d. of 1 V.

So, would I use E = hf to find the frequency, (where E = 5), and then use Speed = Wavelength x Frequency to find the wavelength?

The work function is the least amount of energy needed for an electron to escape from the surface of the metal.

Would I use hf = work function + Ek for this part?

Thanks for your help.

Cathy
Doc Al
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#7
Mar11-07, 09:11 AM
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Quote Quote by CathyLou View Post
1 eV is the energy transferred when an electron moves between two points separated by a p.d. of 1 V.

So, would I use E = hf to find the frequency, (where E = 5), and then use Speed = Wavelength x Frequency to find the wavelength?
E = 5 eV. (Don't leave off the units!) You may have to convert to standard energy units--Joules--when you calculate the frequency. 1 eV = ? Joules? (Look it up!)

Otherwise: Looks good!

The work function is the least amount of energy needed for an electron to escape from the surface of the metal.

Would I use hf = work function + Ek for this part?
You got it.
CathyLou
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#8
Mar11-07, 09:27 AM
P: 173
Quote Quote by Doc Al View Post
E = 5 eV. (Don't leave off the units!) You may have to convert to standard energy units--Joules--when you calculate the frequency. 1 eV = ? Joules? (Look it up!)

Otherwise: Looks good!


You got it.
Okay. Thanks very much.

Cathy
CathyLou
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#9
Mar11-07, 01:01 PM
P: 173
I'm also really struggling with the following questions and so would really appreciate any help.

The minimum wavelength of light that causes emission of photoelectron from a metal surface is 5 x 10-7.

(a) Calculate a value for the work function of the metal in joules and electron volts.

(b) Calculate the maximum kinetic energy of the photoelectrons released from the same metal surface if light of 4.5 x 10-7m were shone onto it.


The work functions of potassium, sodium and zinc are 1.81Ev, 2.28eV and 4.31eV respectively.

(a) Which of these metals when irradiated by incident light of frequency 6 x 1014 Hz would emit photoelectrons? Justify your answer.

(b) Calculate the maximum kinetic energies of the electrons emitted.

(c) Calculate the speed of the electrons emitted ignoring relativistic effects. What % of the speed of light is this?


Thank you.

Cathy
Doc Al
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#10
Mar11-07, 01:49 PM
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You've already used the key relationship that applies here (in post #6), so give these a shot.
CathyLou
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#11
Mar12-07, 02:05 PM
P: 173
I've figured out the anwers for the other questions but I'm still really stuck on this one. Any help would be really appreciated.

4. The work functions of potassium, sodium and zinc are 1.81Ev, 2.28eV and 4.31eV respectively.

(a) Which of these metals when irradiated by incident light of frequency 6 x 1014 Hz would emit photoelectrons? Justify your answer.

(b) Calculate the maximum kinetic energies of the electrons emitted.

(c) Calculate the speed of the electrons emitted ignoring relativistic effects. What % of the speed of light is this?


Thank you.

Cathy
Doc Al
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#12
Mar12-07, 03:14 PM
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Again, it's the same relationship that you used before (at least for parts a and b). Start by figuring out the energy of a 6e14 Hz photon. Then compare that to the given work functions.
CathyLou
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#13
Mar12-07, 04:04 PM
P: 173
Quote Quote by Doc Al View Post
Again, it's the same relationship that you used before (at least for parts a and b). Start by figuring out the energy of a 6e14 Hz photon. Then compare that to the given work functions.
Okay. Thanks for your help.

Cathy
DAVE OF YORK
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#14
Sep23-11, 01:10 PM
P: 1
Hi !
My name is Dave I live in York. U.k. I am only a Particle Extraction Technician (Cleaner).
I read that the Universe is expanding outward at 3000 kilometres per second. What bugs me is Einsteine said that the speed of light is constant, I was told that if you shone a torch at the front of a craft traveling at the speed of light, the torch beam will not be emitted. Should we not be adding the speed of the universe traveling at the speed of 3000 kps. to the speed of Light?......


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