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What is it?

by Evo
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Kurdt
#55
Oct19-07, 07:58 PM
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Surely the groundhog myth is the modern day persephone.
rewebster
#56
Oct19-07, 08:17 PM
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well, she could stay at my place in my spare bedroom for those couple of months while she wasn't in hell

-----------------------

There ya' go Evo, you win one week in Hell (California)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hell,_California
Kurdt
#57
Oct19-07, 08:52 PM
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That has to be the best opening sentence of any wikipedia article ever.
SpaceTiger
#58
Oct19-07, 09:03 PM
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Quote Quote by Gokul43201 View Post
A bit of etymological trivia about the pomegranate: most everyone knows that the word is derived from the latin pomum granatum (apple with many seeds), through the late French pomme grenade (which, doubtless, you are all aware was the origin of the word 'grenade')
Obviously. I mean, what kind of people wouldn't know these things? People with no idea of what's important, that's who! I want to picket these people...

...and I'll smear the signs with pomegranate juice. Now that would be hard-hitting, like a Wolf Blitzer newsbreak on Easter Sunday.
SpaceTiger
#59
Oct19-07, 09:06 PM
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Quote Quote by Evo View Post
Today's "What is it?". Can anyone quess? If you ask, I will give hints.
Perhaps we should preface each of these challenges with an "Is this something?" poll.
rewebster
#60
Oct19-07, 09:06 PM
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My parents took us to Hell on vacation when we visited my grandparents when I was a kid





(on the way to the Colorado River).
Moonbear
#61
Oct19-07, 09:14 PM
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Quote Quote by Gokul43201 View Post
A bit of etymological trivia about the pomegranate: most everyone knows that the word is derived from the latin pomum granatum (apple with many seeds), through the late French pomme grenade (which, doubtless, you are all aware was the origin of the word 'grenade'), but how many of you know that the botanical name of the pomegranate tree (Punica granatum) is the only biological name that has one specific type of bad grammar - the gender of the adjective does not agree with the gender of the noun (it should instead be Punica granata)?
Did you take the useless trivia quiz yet? Or should we just start calling you Cliff?
rewebster
#62
Oct19-07, 09:29 PM
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or Punicum granatum
Gokul43201
#63
Oct20-07, 01:14 AM
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That would work too, but wouldn't be the prefered choice. Most plants are named with genera that are feminine (the Ancient Romans thought of plants as feminine), but there are many cases of neuter (any alpinum) and masculine (asteriscus) genera.
Ivan Seeking
#64
Oct20-07, 04:49 AM
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neutrino
#65
Oct20-07, 08:35 AM
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An active volcano as captured with, say... a UV-filter of some sort.
matthyaouw
#66
Oct20-07, 09:26 AM
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Bioluminescent bacteria (Dinoflagellates?) forming a 'milky sea'. I remember reading an article about that picture before.
Mk
#67
Oct20-07, 09:27 AM
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Quote Quote by rewebster View Post
My parents took us to Hell on vacation when we visited my grandparents when I was a kid
My parents took us to Hell on vacation! But it was Hell, Michigan
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hell,_Michigan
rewebster
#68
Oct20-07, 10:07 AM
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Quote Quote by Mk View Post
My parents took us to Hell on vacation! But it was Hell, Michigan
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hell,_Michigan
Parents in perspective can be pretty funny once in a while, can't they---my, my...my

I guess that there's a choice (free will) then:

MI: "people watch for Hell to "freeze over"

CA: "Hell has been referenced when it is especially hot"


Evo, your choice, where do you want to go?
rewebster
#69
Oct20-07, 10:09 AM
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Ivan---

is that a big, giant dead seahorse?
Gokul43201
#70
Oct20-07, 10:58 AM
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Quote Quote by rewebster View Post
Ivan---

is that a big, giant dead seahorse?
One that died after eating all the dinoflagellates?

PS: I thought you said 'sea monkey'. Seahorses don't like the taste of bacteria.
rewebster
#71
Oct20-07, 11:13 AM
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Quote Quote by Gokul43201 View Post
One that died after eating all the dinoflagellates?

PS: I thought you said 'sea monkey'. Seahorses don't like the taste of bacteria.
IF if is a big, dead seahorse (or monkey)---did it get that big from eating 'DINO' size flagellates?
Gokul43201
#72
Oct20-07, 11:24 AM
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I've done some research on this now, and it turns out you were right the first time. He was a seahorse (a lonely, magic seahorse, named Snuff), and at first, he really didn't like how the flagellates tasted (like 3-month old cedar, with a hink of oak, and way too much salt, he used to complain), but after eating a few million, he found that they grew on him.


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