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Turbo-1's HOT STUFF

by Astronuc
Tags: evo, food, recipes, turbo, turbo1
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wolram
#235
Mar11-08, 08:47 AM
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Hope this shows up ok.
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turbo
#236
Mar11-08, 10:00 AM
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Mine comes out with less liquid, Woolie, so you may want to adjust the recipe a bit. There should be "just" enough liquid to cover the solids when you put the stuff in jars. Remember that the relish should be refrigerated at all times. You don't want to get food poisoning. If you have followed proper canning procedures (sterilized jars and lids, processing in boiling water bath to seal lids, etc) you can store the jars at room temperature, but as soon as they are opened, into the fridge they go.

Have fun with the hot dogs. I fry mine in butter and grill the rolls in butter while I am cooking chopped onions. Mmm! Hot dogs with onions, chili relish, and mustard!
wolram
#237
Mar11-08, 01:07 PM
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Quote Quote by turbo-1 View Post
Mine comes out with less liquid, Woolie,

Have fun with the hot dogs. I fry mine in butter and grill the rolls in butter while I am cooking chopped onions. Mmm! Hot dogs with onions, chili relish, and mustard!
The taste is good, i used smoked garlic, but yes i do need to adjust things a bit.

You fry hot dogs? i thought you were only supposed to boil them.
turbo
#238
Mar11-08, 01:27 PM
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Quote Quote by wolram View Post
The taste is good, i used smoked garlic, but yes i do need to adjust things a bit.

You fry hot dogs? i thought you were only supposed to boil them.
Yep. I fry them in a heavy cast-iron frying pan until they get a little browned - they taste much better than boiled hot dogs. I like them cooked on the grill best, but we're still in the clutches of winter, so frying them is a good alternative.
NeoDevin
#239
Mar11-08, 07:23 PM
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You mean you don't bbq through the winter? I'm farther north than you are, and I never stop bbq-ing.
turbo
#240
Mar12-08, 10:08 AM
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Quote Quote by NeoDevin View Post
You mean you don't bbq through the winter? I'm farther north than you are, and I never stop bbq-ing.
Often, I do, but I like fried hot dogs really well, and the convenience of cooking them in the house where it's warm is nice. Of course, if the wife brings home a nice steak, or if I get a craving for cheeseburgers, I bundle up and start the grill.
Oerg
#241
Mar12-08, 10:23 AM
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coooool...... NOT (it's hot, pun intended :O)

I just love spicy food. Im gonna try that recipe when I have the time
turbo
#242
Mar21-08, 07:21 PM
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I've had a heavy schedule of legal depositions, etc this week, so tonight I slacked off, and we had pan-fried hot dogs for supper (habanero chili relish for me, jalapeno chili relish for my wife) with fried onions and yellow mustard. We've still got a pretty good load of frozen jalapenos from our last crop for soups, casseroles, stir-fries, etc, but I can't wait for the opportunity to test/augment/till our garden soil and get another crop in. In December, I hammered a 4' grade stake into our raised bed of garlic when I planted the cloves to mark the delineation of the German/Russian varieties. I can see almost 1' of the stake now.
wolram
#243
Mar26-08, 11:18 PM
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This sounds good,

1 lb. hamburger
1/2 c. chopped onion
1 env. (1 1/4 oz.) taco seasoning mix
1 can (4 oz.) whole green chilies, chopped and drained
1 c. shredded Monterey Jack cheese (4 oz.)
1 1/4 c. milk
3/4 c. Bisquick mix
3 eggs
1/8 tsp. red pepper sauce

Heat oven to 400, grease pie pan.
Cook hamburger and onion and drain. Stir in seasoning mix, put mixture into pie pan. Sprinkle with chilies and cheese. Beat remaining ingredients until smooth. Pour in pie pan. Bake 30 minutes or until knife comes out clean. Cool 5 minutes.
Schrodinger's Dog
#244
Mar27-08, 08:42 AM
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My favourite recipe.

Order a curry, to specific taste. nth > Tindaloo > Vindaloo > Madras > Balti > Tikka > Korma.

Preferably with some lager and rice, and a side salad ( has to have plenty of onions) + some popadoms or Naan. Then eat it, if stronger than a madrass, go bright red, have your eyes water and say whooo Jeez alot, of stronger than a Vindaloo, retreat to safe distance and wait until the fallout subsides.

It's very hard to get an exceptional curry in this country, but you can if you know where to look, or just happen to live near one. It's not impossible to make a good curry yourself if you know a few Asian grocers. But it's much better if you just order one sit back and enjoy IMO. I'm a good cook but I am also quite lazy, curries take forever to make, especially if you make them properly. It is officially recorded that God invented curry leaves and therefore curry powder to give India an extraordinarily good reason to exist, above and beyond the usual right to self determination, human rights guff and so on.

Thai curries are lovely too, in fact any curries from the Asian continent, are marvellous, and so is Chinese food.
Astronuc
#245
Jul28-08, 07:24 PM
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My chile peppers are doing really well. I think turbo and I need to go into the chile pepper business.

Chile production is a $500 million crop in New Mexico alone, which produces most of the U.S. crop, state agriculture commissioners wrote the FDA on Thursday.

FDA: Avoid jalapenos from Mexico, not US
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/salmonell...VIvJWWtT7lWMcF
WASHINGTON - Only jalapeno peppers grown in Mexico are implicated in the nationwide salmonella outbreak, the government announced Friday in clearing the U.S. crop.

The Food and Drug Administration urged consumers to avoid raw Mexican jalapenos and the serrano peppers often confused with them, or dishes made with them such as fresh salsa.

But the big question is how those who love hot peppers would know where the chiles came from, especially in restaurant food.

"You're going to have to ask the person you're buying it from," said Dr. David Acheson, the FDA's food safety chief, who is advising restaurants and grocery stores to know their suppliers and pass that information to customers.

The big break in an outbreak that now has sickened nearly 1,300 people came on Monday, when FDA announced it had found the same strain of salmonella responsible for the outbreak on a single Mexican-grown jalapeno in a south Texas produce warehouse.
Tomatoes are still suspect.
turbo
#246
Jul28-08, 07:30 PM
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Darn, Astro! Backyard Farms is expanding their (largest enclosed acreage of any building in Maine) greenhouse with yet another greenhouse. With all the tomatoes they grow, surely someone needs to start growing some peppers so that salsa can ensue!!!! Can Mrs. Astro commit to such a project? My wife and I would both love it if you could be Mainiacs!
Evo
#247
Aug30-08, 08:38 PM
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turbo, you would have enjoyed the show on hot food on "Unwrapped" on the Food Network tonight. They showed Blair's death Rain Habanero potato chips, with a scoville rating of 600,000. They are in the Guinness World records as having the hottest foods available.

I don't know how you and astronuc can eat this stuff. For me there is a point where the heat prevents me from tasting the food.

http://extremefood.com/product.php?id=20
Astronuc
#248
Aug30-08, 08:46 PM
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Quote Quote by Evo View Post
turbo, you would have enjoyed the show on hot food on "Unwrapped" on the Food Network tonight. They showed Blair's death Rain Habanero potato chips, with a scoville rating of 600,000. They are in the Guinness World records as having the hottest foods available.

I don't know how you and astronuc can eat this stuff. For me there is a point where the heat prevents me from tasting the food.

http://extremefood.com/product.php?id=20
Blair's makes some good stuff.

I tried one my hot Portugals last night. One tiny piece and it was firey. It was great!
turbo
#249
Aug30-08, 08:59 PM
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Quote Quote by Evo View Post
I don't know how you and astronuc can eat this stuff. For me there is a point where the heat prevents me from tasting the food.

http://extremefood.com/product.php?id=20
Surprisingly, the habanero relish is wonderfully tasty with not much mouth-burn as long as you limit quantities somewhat. After eating a hot-dog with 1/2 tsp of that stuff on it though, your scalp will be wet with sweat. The father of the fellow who rebuilt my Evinrude loves hot food, so today I took him down a big bag of all kinds of chilies (along with beets, carrots, and Bell peppers for his wife) and a jar of the habanero relish that I made a couple of years back from store-bought chilies. It's nowhere near as snarly as the stuff I make from home-grown peppers, but I still told Phil to warn his dad to use caution. I gave a jar to a friend of my fathers a couple of years back because his paraplegic son claimed to LOVE hot stuff. He dipped a taco chip in it, took one bite, and acted like he was going to die.

The old guy has to go in for dialysis every couple of days and recently underwent more than a week of hospitalization for a severe E coli infection (heavy rains causing run-off from a dairy farm a mile away to contaminate their well). He's a crusty old character, and if I can keep him eating healthy stuff (like peppers) that he loves, I'll do it. My wife and I used a standard dill-pickle brine recipe to can a mix of chopped jalapeno and Russian garlic a couple of days ago. It hasn't had sufficient time to brine, yet, but she put some in some fresh salsa this morning and I tried a spoonful of the dilled relish neat. Mmmmm! We put up 36 half-pint jars of that, and I may have to make more. It will be great on sandwiches and in salads.
turbo
#250
Aug30-08, 09:10 PM
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Brine for dill pickles is really simple. A good ratio is 1:2 vinegar:water with a cup or less of kosher salt per quart of vinegar. Bring to a boil, and pour into jars packed with chopped jalapeno chilies, garlic (use LOTS of garlic) and fresh dill. Use the yellow dill florets if possible, but fresh dill weed will suffice. Ladle the boiling brine into each jar, leaving 1/4-1/2" head-space in each jar. Cap and seal the jars (lids and jars MUST be sterilized by boiling before use) and process for a minimum of 20 minutes in boiling water. This stuff is just too easy to make.

NOTE: to anyone who hasn't canned before, get a book on the subject by Ball, Kerr, or some other company that sells canning supplies and read up on processing temperatures, processing times, pH, salt brining, etc. Unsanitary conditions and/or inadequate processing can allow anaerobic nasties like Listeria or botulism to develop, so you've got to follow the rules. I have been eating home-canned foods over the past 55 years or so and have never been sickened by it - my mother and grandmother were always very meticulous about their canning.
Moonbear
#251
Aug30-08, 09:15 PM
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Quote Quote by Evo View Post
I don't know how you and astronuc can eat this stuff. For me there is a point where the heat prevents me from tasting the food.
Everyone has different tolerance levels. Things my mom and stepdad can't eat at all because they claim it's too spicy, I can't even taste heat in. They're going for the water and bread and I'm sitting there confused why they're having a problem because I don't taste any heat at all.

As for the flavor, I can still taste flavor even when the heat is approaching the limits of what I can tolerate, but of course there has to be flavor there in the first place. For example, I think of Buffalo wings. I've had ones that make my lips burn after eating the first one, yet can taste tons of flavor because they're made well with a very flavorful sauce. I've also had ones that are just mildly spicy, but have almost no flavor at all, because the sauce focuses on heat rather than flavors. It probably has to do with what peppers are used to make the sauce...sort of the pepper equivalent to the way tomatoes can either taste sweet and full of flavor when fresh from the garden, or they can be the flavorless things in the grocery store in the middle of winter. They can be all heat with no flavor, they can have lots of flavor but not much heat, or they can have both heat and flavor.
turbo
#252
Aug30-08, 09:16 PM
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Quote Quote by Astronuc View Post
Blair's makes some good stuff.

I tried one my hot Portugals last night. One tiny piece and it was firey. It was great!
What family are the Portugals from?


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