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I think i want to try linux out

by Quadruple Bypass
Tags: linux
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Quadruple Bypass
#37
Nov1-07, 10:22 AM
P: 122
:D haha. yea after reading some of the problems for vista, ill still do it. i hope vista isnt like windows ME all over again (LOL). im gonna install ubuntu so my next question is how do i shorten the amount of default time on the OS choosing screen and the default OS? i remember doing it 5 yrs ago, but i dont remember how.
fargoth
#38
Nov1-07, 12:26 PM
P: 400
you just edit /boot/grub/menu.lst
you can only save it as a super user (root privileges), and Ubuntu is one of the few distributions which don't have a root account by default (for security reasons).
so, you just type:
sudo gedit /boot/grub/menu.lst

comments are marked with # (so the lines beginning with # do nothing but document)
the first two uncommented entries are:
default and timeout - i think you'll know what to do with them =P

by the way, compiz works great on my 6 years old computer, it's even more responsive then metacity. (which is gnome's default window manager - you use it if you choose not to use compiz in Ubuntu)
in fact, the only window manager that felt "lighter" to me was e17 - and it lacks the functionality of gnome, and the beauty of compiz (though it's pretty nice looking too...)

I've also heard about laptop such as ibm T30 that manage to run Ubuntu with compiz (although the one who said it also said it started working very slow for him after upgrading to 7.10... but i guess you can fix it)

the spec for T30 is:
1.8-GHz/1.2-GHz Pentium 4-M, 256MB of DDR266 SDRAM, and ATI Mobility Radeon 7500 AGP with 16MB of DDR SDRAM.
neutrino
#39
Nov1-07, 12:47 PM
P: 2,047
Quadruple, if you are new to Ubuntu, you should have this site bookmarked - VERY useful.

Quote Quote by fargoth View Post
by the way, compiz works great on my 6 years old computer, it's even more responsive then metacity. (which is gnome's default window manager - you use it if you choose not to use compiz in Ubuntu)
in fact, the only window manager that felt "lighter" to me was e17 - and it lacks the functionality of gnome, and the beauty of compiz (though it's pretty nice looking too...)

I've also heard about laptop such as ibm T30 that manage to run Ubuntu with compiz (although the one who said it also said it started working very slow for him after upgrading to 7.10... but i guess you can fix it)

the spec for T30 is:
1.8-GHz/1.2-GHz Pentium 4-M, 256MB of DDR266 SDRAM, and ATI Mobility Radeon 7500 AGP with 16MB of DDR SDRAM.
I have an S3 ProSavage DDR - even Ubuntu knows that it's not worth the trouble messing around with Compiz. I tried enabling Desktop Effects in Feisty, but it was no good.
fargoth
#40
Nov1-07, 12:58 PM
P: 400
oh, and after getting used to running linux as a simple user, I recommend you start learning to do the real magic.
what really makes linux so powerful is shell scripting (though many people prefer python nowadays for it's prettier syntax and the power a full blown programming language offers).

i'll just give you an example of what you can do with it:
(this shell script is a gnome specific script, just to impress you with some GUI =P)

http://g-scripts.sourceforge.net/nau.../video-convert

just follow the instructions at the beginning of the script.
copy and paste it into a file at /home/YourUserName/.gnome2/nautilus-scripts
to make it executable you need to type chmod +x ScripName
or right click it, choose properties and under permissions check the allow execute as a program...

if you want to learn bash scripting, you can look here:
http://tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/
Thrice
#41
Nov2-07, 01:27 AM
P: 233
Quote Quote by neutrino View Post
I have an S3 ProSavage DDR - even Ubuntu knows that it's not worth the trouble messing around with Compiz. I tried enabling Desktop Effects in Feisty, but it was no good.
I can't imagine doing without beryl anymore. Try sabayon on it see if the livecd works.
Quadruple Bypass
#42
Nov15-07, 02:37 PM
P: 122
hey guys, me again. ubuntu website asks:

What type of computer do you have?
-Standard personal computer (x86 architecture, PentiumTM, CeleronTM, AthlonTM, SempronTM)
-64bit AMD and Intel computers

if i get a Satellite A135-S4499 laptop with a core 2 duo processor, which version do i get? i would assume 64, but i dont want my computer to explode or something so i ask you guys lol :)

im also going with 7.10 instead of 6.06, would anyone advise against this?
fargoth
#43
Nov15-07, 06:11 PM
P: 400
go with 7.10, and if you got less then 4GB of RAM theres no real advantage as far as i know for using 64bit... and the disadvantage would be no adobe flash (only the free ones got versions for 64bit, and they aren't that great yet...), and your programs will take more memory...

you can use both 32, and 64bit... but 32bit has more software precompiled (and sometimes thats the only software there is, when it comes to commercial software).
PerennialII
#44
Nov16-07, 01:48 AM
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In daily use the difference probably isn't that pronounced and a 32 bit system can probably be a bit easier to handle. In math intensive benchmarks, if you'd be doing something like "high-performance computing" or overall something which really makes your system work, 64 bit systems excel and would definitely recommend a 64 bit install (if you've something running in 'native' 64 bit). Running 32 bit appls on a 64 bit OS as far as know doesn't lead to performance decrease should be worried about. 64 bit ones have some extra issues occasionally, but it seems like so do 32 ones (been running 64 bit systems as long as they've been on the market and personally don't think there really are any more "issues" than in 32 bit systems). For example the firefox problems are resolved running the 32 bit one in a 64 bit OS, with the flash and all works without missing a beat.
Quadruple Bypass
#45
Nov21-07, 06:23 PM
P: 122
Hey guys, i just got my replacement computer today, and i got screwed over by toshiba. they didnt send the recovery cd with the computer and when i called them they said i can buy it from them for 40 bucks (no thanks a-holes). can i still install ubuntu without losing vista?

edit: i meant because of the partitions
PerennialII
#46
Nov22-07, 12:06 PM
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With 99.99% prob yes (which means barring any unforeseen unusual unexpected glitch ) .... typically it's quite a bit easier to 1st install win and then linux, linux can handle setting up the bootloader for multiboot without any "issues" unlike win. Before you can do the install need 'just' to get your partitions in order (or if your ubuntu install media has the tools for it, like "gparted" so that you can repartition if need to during the install process without cleaning the system). So is the whole drive in one piece + if some of you ubuntu guys could say a word whether the install media for ubuntu has the partition tools included [RH rules! ]?
Quadruple Bypass
#47
Nov22-07, 01:55 PM
P: 122
well i did it. ubuntu is installed and running. i had some sound problems (a135 toshiba satellite) but i quickly went to google and found a lot of people had the same problem. took me a while, but i fixed it :) i am loving it so far.
PerennialII
#48
Nov22-07, 02:26 PM
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......way to go! After a while you'll notice ( ) a growing urge to re-format your windows partition and add the space to your linux install (which you can do seamlessly in linux without new weird drive letters of course), perhaps having a virtual machine of a windows install somewhere for those weak moments when may need the thing for some "trivial" task.
neutrino
#49
Nov23-07, 12:39 PM
P: 2,047
Congrats!
Link-
#50
Nov26-07, 05:34 PM
P: 98
Hi,

I'm also trying to start using linux, but I wan't to know if I could install linux in an external hard drive.

I want to have windows on the internal harddrive and the linux in the external hard drive and when ever I want to use linux connect the external hd and use it.

My other question is, can I make two partitions on the external hd, one for Win files not related to any OS and the other for linux OS?


Thanks
-Link
PerennialII
#51
Nov27-07, 01:28 PM
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Yes - and it's a neat way of doing it while preserving your original system. There is the requirement that your hardware (BIOS) needs to be able to boot from the external drive, usb/firewire/esata or whatever you might be using. "Relatively recent" systems shouldn't have a problem, you can check this by entering BIOS when starting your system and checking the boot order (and while you're at it make sure the external drive is ahead of your internal HDD).

And yes, you can naturally make 2 partitions to your external drive and install linux to the other, linux distros don't necessarily take up much space at all (I've one with me in a usb stick at all times ). You can do the partitioning when doing the linux install, from your existing system, or then use a specialized tool like gparted or partition magic.

And probably a good idea to make sure you've backups of your system and overall make sure you don't "confuse" the drives while you're at it .
Link-
#52
Nov27-07, 09:53 PM
P: 98
Quote Quote by PerennialII View Post
Yes - and it's a neat way of doing it while preserving your original system. There is the requirement that your hardware (BIOS) needs to be able to boot from the external drive, usb/firewire/esata or whatever you might be using. "Relatively recent" systems shouldn't have a problem, you can check this by entering BIOS when starting your system and checking the boot order (and while you're at it make sure the external drive is ahead of your internal HDD).

And yes, you can naturally make 2 partitions to your external drive and install linux to the other, linux distros don't necessarily take up much space at all (I've one with me in a usb stick at all times ). You can do the partitioning when doing the linux install, from your existing system, or then use a specialized tool like gparted or partition magic.

And probably a good idea to make sure you've backups of your system and overall make sure you don't "confuse" the drives while you're at it .
Thanks for the help.

I will try then linux.
PerennialII
#53
Nov27-07, 10:45 PM
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.... the "infestation" spreads . If you google something like 'installing linux on usb' you'll likely find a couple of tutorials you can review beforehand (or 'installing fedora on usb' in my case).


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