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Difference between beta and electron particle

by electron
Tags: beta, difference, electron, particle
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electron
#1
Nov13-07, 08:34 AM
P: 19
hi..

we all know a electron and a beta patricle have charge -1e ..
now my question is.. when radioactivity takes place ..the nucleus emits beta particles sometimes....

now can we say that the electron is being emitted from the nucleus..since both beta and electron have the same charge..

i know tis is wrong...but dont know why...

does any one have any clue ..??
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Shooting Star
#2
Nov13-07, 08:47 AM
HW Helper
P: 1,979
Beta-(minus) rays are nothing but electrons. Beta+ rays, emitted in inverse beta decay, are positrons.
electron
#3
Nov13-07, 10:08 AM
P: 19
but in real how do we physically differentiate them..

Shooting Star
#4
Nov13-07, 10:16 AM
HW Helper
P: 1,979
Difference between beta and electron particle

We don't differentiate between beta-minus rays and electrons, if that's what you are asking. Electrons as a component of atom was discovered in 1897. Also, around 1896, the three kind of "rays" coming from radioactive decay was called alpha, beta and gamma rays. Afterwards, it was found that the beta rays were made up of high speed electrons.
electron
#5
Nov13-07, 10:57 AM
P: 19
ahh.. i get it hopefully...

tankx

chears !!


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