Register to reply

Gamma spectroscopy

by indigojoker
Tags: gamma, spectroscopy
Share this thread:
indigojoker
#1
Nov23-07, 02:55 PM
P: 248
Is there a way to measure the atomic number of a source using gamma spectroscopy? Like, I know that if you have different back scattering material, it will produced different intensity backscattering peaks, but is there a formula that relates intensity of backscattered peaks to the atomic number?
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
World's largest solar boat on Greek prehistoric mission
Google searches hold key to future market crashes
Mineral magic? Common mineral capable of making and breaking bonds
malawi_glenn
#2
Nov23-07, 03:06 PM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
malawi_glenn's Avatar
P: 4,739
gamma spectroscopy measures the enegy of the emitted photons when a metastable state deexcites. Rutherford backscattering, you not use gamma rays..
indigojoker
#3
Nov23-07, 03:26 PM
P: 248
umm back scattering from compton effect. gamma rays hit electron and if the scattering angle is 180 degree, then the scattered gamma ray will leave energy in the detector forming the backscattering peak while the scattered electron will form the compton edge.

so my question is asking if there is a way to measure the atomic number of the radioactive source using different backscattering materials (such as lead and aluminum) and measuring the difference in backscattering peak?

indigojoker
#4
Dec5-07, 04:55 PM
P: 248
Gamma spectroscopy

hmm still no ideas?
malawi_glenn
#5
Dec6-07, 01:09 AM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
malawi_glenn's Avatar
P: 4,739
there are better ways to measure Z of material, then using backscattered gammas (compton edge). Rutherford Backscattering is the method which is used in industry nowadays. See for example Krane: Introductory nuclear physics, p 796 and forward.
indigojoker
#6
Dec6-07, 09:27 PM
P: 248
this is for a lab. i am still confused to HOW someone can measure the Z of material using backscattered gamma rays? could you explain?
malawi_glenn
#7
Dec7-07, 05:23 AM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
malawi_glenn's Avatar
P: 4,739
There are formulas where the compton edge is given as a function of atomic number of the material and incoming energy of the photon.
indigojoker
#8
Dec7-07, 09:23 AM
P: 248
i have never seen the compton edge be related to the atomic number. it would be great if i can be directed to this formula because i've been looking for it and can't find it
malawi_glenn
#9
Dec7-07, 09:25 AM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
malawi_glenn's Avatar
P: 4,739
Not me neither, but if your lab assistants wants you to find such a relation, it should exist. If not, then maybe you have missunderstood the lab-info.
indigojoker
#10
Dec7-07, 09:34 AM
P: 248
by "find such a relation" they mean go on the internet and look. there is no way i can "derive" such an equation from the experiments, i was just wondering if they were online at all
malawi_glenn
#11
Dec7-07, 09:43 AM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
malawi_glenn's Avatar
P: 4,739
internet? Why not textbooks in libraries etc?
indigojoker
#12
Dec7-07, 05:42 PM
P: 248
"i have never seen the compton edge be related to the atomic number. it would be great if i can be directed to this formula because i've been looking for it and can't find it"
malawi_glenn
#13
Dec8-07, 12:41 AM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
malawi_glenn's Avatar
P: 4,739
What sources have you considered? Google?

Why not texbooks about experimental nuclear physics / introductory books in Nuclear physics - chapters on experiment.
indigojoker
#14
Dec8-07, 11:29 AM
P: 248
i tried all of that. i have six nuclear/experimental physics books from the library and when they talk about gamma ray spectroscopy, it doesnt mention anything about compton edge and atomic number. i've read all the internet sources on it, i dont think one exists...


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Gamma spectroscopy Advanced Physics Homework 1
Relation of g^uv = (1/2) {gamma^u,gamma^v} to gravitational fields General Physics 15
Peaks in gamma spectroscopy Atomic, Solid State, Comp. Physics 1
Gamma Function, Gamma 1/2=root pi Calculus & Beyond Homework 4