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Salts and ionic compounds

by Mr_Bojingles
Tags: compounds, ionic, salts
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Mr_Bojingles
#1
Mar2-08, 08:52 PM
P: 79
Does a salt always have an ionic bond in it regardless of whether it's constituents are covalently bonded or not? When an acid reacts with a base does it always create a salt by means of ionic bonding? I hear all salts are soluble in water but bases are not. What about acids. Are acids soluble in polar or non polar solvents? Also do salts always ionize when dissolved in water?
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LtStorm
#2
Mar2-08, 09:33 PM
P: 76
Salts are ionic compounds by definition. If it has a complex anion or cation that happens to be covalent, the actual salt itself is still formed by an ionic bond. And yes, the product of an acid-base neutralization reaction is a salt--also by definition. All acids and bases are soluble to some degree in water--otherwise they wouldn't be acids and bases. Salts can be insoluble in water, and this varies widely from stuff like sodium chloride that practically has no limit on its solubility to barium sulfate that dissolves only a very tiny amount.

Water is a polar solvent, so, yes, acids are usually soluble in those. I can't remember how the usually dissolve in non-polar solvents, as pretty much all the rules of solubility I was taught were based on water as the solvent. And yes, salts generally ionize in water--the effect of them dissolving.
lightarrow
#3
Mar3-08, 08:17 AM
P: 1,521
Quote Quote by Mr_Bojingles View Post
Does a salt always have an ionic bond in it regardless of whether it's constituents are covalently bonded or not?
What do you mean with "it's constituents"? If the bonds inside a compound are covalent, then the compound is not ionic!
When an acid reacts with a base does it always create a salt by means of ionic bonding?
It depends on how you define the word "base"; as is usually defined, yes.
I hear all salts are soluble in water
That's wrong, there are many insoluble salts.
but bases are not
Wrong, there are many soluble and many insoluble bases.
What about acids. Are acids soluble in polar or non polar solvents?
They can be soluble as well as insoluble, for both polar and non polar solvents.
Also do salts always ionize when dissolved in water?
Almost always.


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