masters degree in EE


by DefaultName
Tags: degree, masters
DefaultName
DefaultName is offline
#1
Mar21-08, 12:00 AM
P: 181
how favorable is an accelerated ms/bs program sound to an employer, as compared to a regular 2-2.5 year MS? (finish my BS and MS in 5 years... start taking grad class in senior year)

also, im thinking about going the MS-project/exam route, than a thesis. What do employers think of this generally?

Thanks.
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jhicks
jhicks is offline
#2
Mar21-08, 12:07 AM
P: 337
MS is pretty short - you're overestimating the time it takes to get one. I can't think of a reason why BS/MS would be less regarded than MS nonthesis given the only difference is you double count courses for degree purposes.
Cyrus
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#3
Mar21-08, 12:21 AM
Cyrus's Avatar
P: 4,780
They probably dont care. A masters is a masters is a masters is a masters. If it took you 2 or 10 years. You are an application with a masters.

(NOTE, they will care what *kind of masters you have)

DefaultName
DefaultName is offline
#4
Mar21-08, 10:40 AM
P: 181

masters degree in EE


Yes - that's what it is. You take graduate level courses in your senior year and it counts towards both your BS degree and your MS degree. The requirements are the same for the accelerated program and for the individual program.
quadraphonics
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#5
Mar21-08, 12:47 PM
P: 270
There is no difference between BS/MS and a separate MS, besides the age you will be when you finish. However, most schools I'm familiar with do not allow you to count any classes towards both your BS and MS. They will recognize that you've completed the relevant coursework, but you can't apply them as credits towards both degrees (the result being that you end up taking more graduate courses than a regular MS would, which is a good thing).

Also, I'd say that the project/exam route is preferred over the MS thesis, for the reason that you simply can't do enough research and publication in the course of doing an MS to write a worthwhile thesis. Many schools do not even offer the MS thesis option any more (or even the MS at all), as it is perceived to be a waste of professors' time to oversee short research projects that don't go anywhere. Don't let that stop you from doing a thesis if you decide you want to, but I don't think it will get you anywhere that the exam wouldn't.
DefaultName
DefaultName is offline
#6
Mar21-08, 04:24 PM
P: 181
I've been considering the course option route... instead of the thesis/research route.


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