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Gauge Bosons.

by trv
Tags: bosons, gauge
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trv
#1
Apr23-09, 08:52 PM
P: 77
Quick question. If particles that mediate interactions are called gauge bosons, why isn't Pion considered a gauge boson. I'm pretty sure I've come across a few interactions mediated by it.
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hamster143
#2
Apr23-09, 09:07 PM
P: 986
I think you could say that pion is a gauge boson of chiral symmetry.
malawi_glenn
#3
Apr24-09, 12:13 AM
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yeah, but it has nothing to do with gauge there - rather you would say that it is a goldstone boson.

blechman
#4
Apr24-09, 10:05 AM
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P: 779
Gauge Bosons.

gauge bosons also have spin 1, while the goldstone boson is spin 0.

it's not right to think of gauge bosons as "particles that mediate interactions" - all particles can "mediate interactions" of a sort. It's called a gauge boson because the field has a "gauge symmetry" (just like the electromagnetic field).
trv
#5
Apr26-09, 10:25 AM
P: 77
Just realised that the pion is a meson. So I assume now that the two aren't mutually exclusive. I.e. a meson can also be a boson, or at least a goldstone boson.
malawi_glenn
#6
Apr26-09, 10:39 AM
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Quote Quote by trv View Post
Just realised that the pion is a meson. So I assume now that the two aren't mutually exclusive. I.e. a meson can also be a boson, or at least a goldstone boson.
You are mixing things up..

Boson is the opposite to fermion, a boson has integer spin, a fermion has half-integer spin.

Meson means that it is a strongly interacting particle with two valence quarks (one quark, and one anit-quark)

All Mesons are bosons, but not all bosons are mesons ...
kuon
#7
May13-09, 04:27 PM
P: 23
If I remember correctly, pions are the pseudo-goldstone bosons when chiral symmetry is broken.
Bob_for_short
#8
Jun2-09, 04:00 PM
P: 1,160
Quote Quote by kuon View Post
If I remember correctly, pions are the pseudo-goldstone bosons when chiral symmetry is broken.
I am sure I do not remember it correctly, but it seemed to me that pions were the gauge bosons of the isotopic symmetry group (Yang-Mills fields).

Bob_for_short.
blechman
#9
Jun2-09, 05:13 PM
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Quote Quote by Bob_for_short View Post
I am sure I do not remember it correctly, but it seemed to me that pions were the gauge bosons of the isotopic symmetry group (Yang-Mills fields).

Bob_for_short.
No, that's wrong. The (strong) isospin symmetry group is a global symmetry, so there are no gauge bosons.

The pions are (pseudo) Nambu-Goldstone bosons of the strong isospin group.

Definitely not Yang-Mills.


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