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PH spectrum

by Rajini
Tags: spectrum
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Rajini
#1
Dec28-09, 03:08 PM
P: 600
Dear all,
i need to clarify some doubts about counting radioactive sources..
For e.g., in my case i use a proportional counter (filled with Xe-gas) for detecting radioactivity..
Now if we measure a pulse height (PH) spectrum using a detector (pulse height mode) we will get a pulse height spectrum. I read in some (i forgot the name!) book and if i understood properly that the area under the whole PH spectrum is just the activity of the source measured! (off course if the detector has 100% efficiency). no more details available in that book!.
and my question is..suppose in 57CO source the 14.4 keV is only 9.2 per 100 disintegrations...then the ratio:
area under the 14.4 keV / whole area under spectrum= say 'X'. is there some possibility to connect this 'X' with 9.2%??
or knowing the geometry, i mean the distance between the source and detector and diameter etc...is there any possibility to make use of the area under a specific curve in some formula...? to get the activity of source?
PS: PH spectrum has X-axis in volts or channels (i have the spectrum and i can select channel or volts).
Y-axis is count rate (in that book they mentioned Y-axis has inverse volts)...
I guess lots of nuclear physicist in PF hopefully some one can shield light in my problem??
thanks
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