how do "zero g" planes work?


by pr1de
Tags: planes, work, zero g
pr1de
pr1de is offline
#1
Feb15-10, 11:28 AM
P: 9
As the title says, I'm curious about how Zero G planes work. They can't get into orbit , because there's no way they're engines could provide thrust for such speed, and they don't really leave the atmosphere. I've read that they way it's done is by simulating sort of a elevator drop effect, going up... and then dropping , and the persons inside it are floating in free fall. i understand it so far, but when the plane is dropping, and the people are in mid air.. how come the plane's back doesn't smash into them? they would have to be at the exact same velocity ( the human and plane). right?
Phys.Org News Partner Physics news on Phys.org
The hemihelix: Scientists discover a new shape using rubber bands (w/ video)
Mapping the road to quantum gravity
Chameleon crystals could enable active camouflage (w/ video)
mgb_phys
mgb_phys is offline
#2
Feb15-10, 11:34 AM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
P: 8,961
Yes - everything falls at the same speed.
So a plane dropping out of the sky and the people inside it are falling at the same rate and so feel weightless, exactly the same as in a falling elevator.

In practice it's a little trickier, the plane feels the drag of the air around it so wouldn't fall as fast as the people inside - it has to actually power into a particular dive to compensate
rcgldr
rcgldr is offline
#3
Feb15-10, 12:12 PM
HW Helper
P: 6,931
The pilot builds up speed, pulls upwards, then places the plane into a "parabolic" path, which is technically elliptical relative to earths' center, adjusting pitch and throttle control to maintain the path. In the NASA version, the plane would pull up into a 45 degree climb, then follow a zero g path until a 30 degree descent, where it needed to pull out to avoid excess speed and loss of altitude. You'd get about 25 seconds of "zero g" every 65 second cycle.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vomit_Comet

Rasalhague
Rasalhague is offline
#4
Feb15-10, 12:26 PM
P: 1,400

how do "zero g" planes work?


Quote Quote by Jeff Reid View Post
The pilot builds up speed, pulls upwards, then places the plane into a "parabolic" path, which is technically elliptical relative to earths' center
If the path is technically elliptical, why is it called parabolic and how can it be described using a parabolic equation? Is it because the path approximates a parabola when there's no great change of distance to the earth's centre of mass but would be seen to be elliptical if it was possible to follow it through the earth without impediment?
pr1de
pr1de is offline
#5
Feb15-10, 01:46 PM
P: 9
thank you for the answers
rcgldr
rcgldr is offline
#6
Feb15-10, 02:36 PM
HW Helper
P: 6,931
Quote Quote by Rasalhague View Post
If the path is technically elliptical, why is it called parabolic and how can it be described using a parabolic equation? Is it because the path approximates a parabola when there's no great change of distance to the earth's centre of mass but would be seen to be elliptical if it was possible to follow it through the earth without impediment?
A parabolic path would occur if the earth was flat and an infinitely large disk or plane. A relatively low alititudes, and short horizontal distance traveled, the "flat earth" model is close enough. As you mentioned the relative distance traveled relative to the center of earth would be small. The horizontal distance traveled versus curvature of the earth would also need to be small.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Difference between "Identical", "Equal", "Equivalent" Calculus & Beyond Homework 9
Finding Volume between Two planes "Help" Calculus & Beyond Homework 4
Work Done "On" or "By" The System Classical Physics 4
"Wrapping" Planes Beyond the Standard Model 0