Cat Speak, and other animal languages


by Ivan Seeking
Tags: animal, languages, speak
GeorginaS
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#37
Sep26-10, 10:11 AM
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Quote Quote by lisab View Post
Declawing is inexcusable, imo. More and more, vets are refusing to do it (yay!).

Yay! I pointedly boycott vets who do it.
rhody
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#38
Sep26-10, 07:31 PM
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Quote Quote by GeorginaS View Post
Yay! I pointedly boycott vets who do it.
Georgina, Lisa,

I didn't mean to start a war, lol. I just believe cats deserve a fighting chance in life, with all their resources. Don't get me going but I know a co-worker who de-barked her border collie, and I find that cruel as well, but here we are talking about noise. Her dog barks but it sounds like a weak cough. She was also the one who told me about de-clawing years ago, at the time I didn't even know they did it.

Rhody...
GeorginaS
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#39
Sep26-10, 08:36 PM
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Quote Quote by rhody View Post
Georgina, Lisa,

I didn't mean to start a war, lol. I just believe cats deserve a fighting chance in life, with all their resources. Don't get me going but I know a co-worker who de-barked her border collie, and I find that cruel as well, but here we are talking about noise. Her dog barks but it sounds like a weak cough. She was also the one who told me about de-clawing years ago, at the time I didn't even know they did it.

Rhody...

Not sure what war you're talking about, Rhody. I was simply agreeing with Lisa. I abhor animal cruelty and no lees especially when it comes to mutilating animals who live in our houses with us and have behaviours we find "inconvenient". No matter what, there's a way to work with the behaviour and modify it without harming the animal. Declawing is and astounding amount of harm to cause a cat. I'd have a really difficult time dealing with someone who'd had their dog's vocal chords cut.
Ivan Seeking
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#40
Sep26-10, 09:04 PM
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Quote Quote by GeorginaS View Post
Not sure what war you're talking about, Rhody. I was simply agreeing with Lisa. I abhor animal cruelty and no lees especially when it comes to mutilating animals who live in our houses with us and have behaviours we find "inconvenient". No matter what, there's a way to work with the behaviour and modify it without harming the animal. Declawing is and astounding amount of harm to cause a cat. I'd have a really difficult time dealing with someone who'd had their dog's vocal chords cut.
These practices grew in popularity because people didn't understand the harm they were doing. I regret to say that > twenty years ago, back when we lived in the city, we declawed our indoor-only cats. And we did see one cat's personality change drastically after being declawed. Before the surgery he was a relatively agressive young male, and afterwards he was spooky and skittish, and remained that way for life.

The vets were selling this as a viable option. I had no idea it was so bad.
DaveC426913
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#41
Sep26-10, 09:41 PM
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So, how does everyone feel about circumcision (human)?
Loren Booda
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#42
Sep26-10, 10:20 PM
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I fed Kitty her night snack just now, and as usual she roots around in this dry food, delaying the inevitable empty bowl. Is she showing her appreciation to my largess, or just stretching out her rations?
GeorginaS
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#43
Sep27-10, 01:21 AM
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Quote Quote by DaveC426913 View Post
So, how does everyone feel about circumcision (human)?
Not in favour of that either, actually.

But, that's not one's primary weapon of defense, is it?

The interesting thing, I suppose, about animals and living with them is discovering how much of their behaviour is specific communication. That's fascinating. Learning to "speak cat" or "speak dog" or speak whatever animal shares you life is invaluable. And you're the human; you've got the analytical brain, it's incumbent upon you to learn what they're saying when they do stuff. It makes living with them far more rewarding than any amount of anthropomorphising or misunderstandings.
DaveC426913
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#44
Sep27-10, 08:23 AM
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Quote Quote by GeorginaS View Post
But, that's not one's primary weapon of defense, is it?
I suppose not.
rhody
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#45
Sep27-10, 09:08 AM
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Quote Quote by GeorginaS View Post
Not sure what war you're talking about, Rhody. I was simply agreeing with Lisa. I abhor animal cruelty and no lees especially when it comes to mutilating animals who live in our houses with us and have behaviours we find "inconvenient". No matter what, there's a way to work with the behaviour and modify it without harming the animal. Declawing is and astounding amount of harm to cause a cat. I'd have a really difficult time dealing with someone who'd had their dog's vocal chords cut.
Lisa, Georgina,

So do it, I don't agree with de-barking a dog either. I find it odd that someone who I worked with a long time (has three kids) and in most ways appears normal would do it. It just goes to show that even though you work at times closely with people, how they make the decisions that they do is a mystery. We are not close friends, just acquaintances and work in the same office.

I used to share ride duties (another job sites location) with another guy (divorced) has a cat, and he just happened to mention he left the cat for two weeks by itself, neighbor would change litter box, food, water, etc... but no human contact other than that, when I told him that was not cool he threatened me, needless to say, we don't share rides or speak anymore. He is an 'odd' duck anyway, and was not good for a healthy outlook on life ,so I say good riddance.

Rhody...
lisab
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#46
Sep27-10, 10:05 AM
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Quote Quote by rhody View Post
Lisa, Georgina,

So do it, I don't agree with de-barking a dog either. I find it odd that someone who I worked with a long time (has three kids) and in most ways appears normal would do it. It just goes to show that even though you work at times closely with people, how they make the decisions that they do is a mystery. We are not close friends, just acquaintances and work in the same office.

I used to share ride duties (another job sites location) with another guy (divorced) has a cat, and he just happened to mention he left the cat for two weeks by itself, neighbor would change litter box, food, water, etc... but no human contact other than that, when I told him that was not cool he threatened me, needless to say, we don't share rides or speak anymore. He is an 'odd' duck anyway, and was not good for a healthy outlook on life ,so I say good riddance.

Rhody...
I think that's exactly in line with the topic of this thread, reading animal language. For those of us who are lucky to be sensitive to animals' moods and emotions, doing such things (abandoning a pet or mutilating it) are simply unthinkable. I suppose for those who see animals as...well, "just" animals...they don't have those considerations.
rhody
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#47
Sep27-10, 10:55 AM
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Quote Quote by lisab View Post
I suppose for those who see animals as...well, "just" animals...they don't have those considerations.
Lisa,

You hit it right on the head, no need to say anymore on my part, we are crystal clear on this...

Thanks...

Rhody...


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