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Difference between 'q' and 'ΔH' in thermochemistry?

by zorro
Tags: Δh, difference, thermochemistry
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zorro
#1
Oct4-10, 06:39 PM
P: 1,394
What is the basic difference between 'q' and 'ΔH' in thermochemistry? I get confused between them!
Is there any criteria for ΔH to become equal to q?
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alxm
#2
Oct4-10, 09:19 PM
Sci Advisor
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Quote Quote by Abdul Quadeer View Post
What is the basic difference between 'q' and 'ΔH' in thermochemistry? I get confused between them! Is there any criteria for ΔH to become equal to q?
Q is an amount of heat being transferred and only heat. The change in enthalpy (ΔH), is the change in total energy of the system. That includes heat, but also pressure/volume work and entropy.

Gibbs' free energy, ΔG, is a measure of the change of the useful (i.e. work-producing) energy of the system, given no change in temperature or pressure. So it's simply the enthalpy minus the entropy.

So the heat transferred to a system in a reaction, Q, equals ΔH only if there is no change in pressure/volume or entropy. (You also neglect how the change in temperature caused by the heat from ΔH changes ΔH itself)


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