idea of anti-gravity


by Arsonade
Tags: antigravity
Arsonade
Arsonade is offline
#1
Sep21-04, 01:52 PM
P: 150
hi just tinkering around with the idea of anti-gravity and i think i came up with something disproving it's possible, i cant explain right now (homeowrk) but i need to know if anyone has any ideas on how to break einsteins theory that matter cannot be created or destroyed. is there any way to create matter from nothing?

know it sounds ridiculous

Adam

P.S. my other post- http://www.physicsforums.com/showthr...pid+crazy+guys
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Sirus
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#2
Sep21-04, 07:04 PM
P: 582
My friend, if anyone could "break" Einstein's theory, he or she would be browsing through the Nobel Prize Laureates forum, not this one.
Arsonade
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#3
Sep21-04, 07:11 PM
P: 150
Quote Quote by Sirus
My friend, if anyone could "break" Einstein's theory, he or she would be browsing through the Nobel Prize Laureates forum, not this one.
lol yeah i guess thats a good point, but for what ive seen in this fourum, i wouldnt be surprised

but what bout the big bang , matter had to come from somthing somwhere down the timeline

Adam

HallsofIvy
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#4
Sep21-04, 07:40 PM
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idea of anti-gravity


I'm wondering what you mean by "Einstein's theory that matter cannot be destroyed"!
It was Einstein that showed that matter can be converted to and from energy. The "law of conservation of matter-energy" is a lot older and bigger than Einstein.
Sirus
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#5
Sep21-04, 07:41 PM
P: 582
Hmm, yes, these are the greatest of the numerous unsolved mysteries in physics.
Integral
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#6
Sep21-04, 08:11 PM
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Sorry, I see no possibility of this turning into a discussion of accepted Physics.
Arsonade
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#7
Sep22-04, 12:20 AM
P: 150
ok nm then
Vern
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#8
Sep22-04, 06:56 AM
P: 123
Quote Quote by Integral
Sorry, I see no possibility of this turning into a discussion of accepted Physics.
Too bad, I thought it was just getting interesting Looked like we might get into how the bigbang could produce the universe from nothing violating just about every law of physics we know of and still be accepted Physics.

But what do I know ??

Keep on chuggin !!

Vern
Arsonade
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#9
Sep22-04, 05:28 PM
P: 150
Quote Quote by Vern
Too bad, I thought it was just getting interesting Looked like we might get into how the bigbang could produce the universe from nothing violating just about every law of physics we know of and still be accepted Physics.

But what do I know ??

Keep on chuggin !!

Vern
yeah tahts wat i was lookin for, any ideas cause i dont know

Adam

P.S. I sent u a private message on a reply, don know if u got it
h8ter
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#10
Sep22-04, 07:17 PM
P: 32
Big Bang violates many laws in physics. It is something that comes from nothing. This obviously implies that matter and energy can be created. How is it that many acclaimed scientists believe in something that gives rise to so many contradictions, yet is readily overlooked?

Question: How did the big bang create space-time?

I'm with Vern; What do I know also?
Chronos
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#11
Sep22-04, 08:02 PM
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Something from nothing? Whatever made you think the universe is something? It is a quantum collection of somethings whose total is ...nothing. A favorite quote of mine on this subject:

"The answer is that the total energy of the universe is exactly zero. The matter in the universe is made out of positive energy. However, the matter is all attracting itself by gravity. Two pieces of matter that are close to each other have less energy than the same two pieces a long way apart, because you have to expend energy to separate them against the gravitational force that is pulling them together. Thus, in a sense, the gravitational field has negative energy. In the case of a universe that is approximately uniform in space, one can show that this negative gravitational energy exactly cancels the positive energy represented by the matter. So the total energy of the universe is zero." (Stephen Hawking, A Brief History of Time)
russ_watters
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#12
Sep22-04, 10:00 PM
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Guys, you are wrong about the BBT because you don't even understand what it says, much less what that means. Before you can prove it wrong, you have to learn what it is.
Arsonade
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#13
Sep22-04, 11:11 PM
P: 150
Quote Quote by russ_watters
Guys, you are wrong about the BBT because you don't even understand what it says, much less what that means. Before you can prove it wrong, you have to learn what it is.
that is a good point inst it lol, and as for Chronos, r u saying that we do not actually have matter and therefore do not exist?

Adam
The_Thinker
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#14
Sep23-04, 12:11 AM
P: 148
That's really a cool exerpt chronos... where did u ge it from? And russ know nywhere where we can get info BBT?
Chronos
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#15
Sep23-04, 02:44 AM
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Stephen Hawking. The point is the universe is full of things that add up to zero. This is entirely consistent with quantum theory. It also agrees with GR. If you guys want more detail on that, I will give you links to papers by people who know far more that I do. I barely grasp the basics. Most true scientists agree the universe is a mystery.

To clarify for Arsonade, the principles we have discovered do not violate the apparent laws governing reality. The laws of thermodynamics do not forbid our existence. They only insist upon a balancing force.
Antonio Lao
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#16
Sep23-04, 06:35 AM
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If gravity is a force, then anti-gravity is the anti-force. If gravity has a positive direction with respect to a coordinate system then the anti-gravity has a negative direction. But gravity is a central force and also a conservative force which does not depend on the path. This seems to imply that gravity is the anti-force of itself.

This is due to the fact that all coordinate systems must be used when formulating a complete physical theory. But because of underlying symmetries, we were used to ignore all but the right-handed system of coordinates. When all frames of reference are used, it is necessary to attribute the properties of directional invariance. These properties can only make sense at the local infinitesimal region of spacetime.
Arsonade
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#17
Sep23-04, 05:45 PM
P: 150
so theres an antiarsonade somewhere out there? lol im jus kiddi, so that meens that for every photon of light there is a--- and for every watt of electriciy there is a --- or am i misunderstanding?

Adam
Antonio Lao
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#18
Sep23-04, 05:50 PM
P: 1,443
Quote Quote by Arsonade
so theres an antiarsonade somewhere out there?
You mean antimatter not antiforce? As far as photon goes, it's its own antiparticle. So is the same thing with the theoretical graviton except that graviton can interact with itself but the photon cannot interact with itself. Though it can interact with other photons.


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