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Damped Harmonic Motion with a Sinusoidal Driving Force

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roldy
#1
Jan21-11, 04:18 PM
P: 194
1. An oscillator with mass 0.5 kg, stiffness 100 N/m, and mechanical resistance 1.4 kg/s is driven by a sinusoidal force of amplitude 2 N. Plot the speed amplitude and the phase angle between the force and speed as a function of the driving frequency and find the frequencies for which the phase angle is 45.



2. m[tex]\ddot{x}[/tex] +Rm[tex]\dot{x}[/tex]+kx=Fosin[tex]\omega[/tex]t

see attachment for rest of equations





3. m= 0.5 kg, s=100N/m, Rm=1.4 kg/s, Fo=2N

So my first question is this, is omega the independent variable in this case? Meaning, I solve everything that I am able to and leave omega alone. Also, is the differential equation in #2 the right form?

I am confused at how I obtain the equation of motion so that I can plot this.
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vela
#2
Jan21-11, 05:00 PM
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PF Gold
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Yes, ω is the driving frequency, so it's the independent variable for what's being asked in the problem. I'm not sure what you mean by "leaving ω alone." You want to express the speed amplitude and the phase angle as a function of ω and the constant parameters of the system.

Yes, your differential equation is correct. It is the equation of motion for the system. Note that k is the spring constant, which you called also called s in the other equations.

I think you have a typo in your equation for the phase angle. Also, what does c represent in that formula?
roldy
#3
Jan22-11, 03:05 PM
P: 194
The equation for the phase angle is wrong it should be tan[tex]^{-1}[/tex](H)
where H=[tex]\frac{\omega*m-k/\omega}{R_{m}}[/tex].

I'm still a little confused about what they are asking for in regards to plotting.

vela
#4
Jan22-11, 10:40 PM
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PF Gold
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Damped Harmonic Motion with a Sinusoidal Driving Force

By "speed amplitude," I assume the problem is asking for the amplitude of v(t). It will depend on ω.


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