To calculate my cumulative GPA would I just...


by Edin_Dzeko
Tags: cumulative
Edin_Dzeko
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#1
Apr21-11, 01:28 PM
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Take my current GPA add it to my cumulative GPA and divide by 2? I have already completed one semester of college and I got a 3.11 (8 credits) Im currently taking 18 and expecting to earn 14/18 credits. So suppose my current GPA comes to like 1.70 would I add 1.70+3.11 and divide by 2 to get my cumulative GPA? I would pay any regard to the credits I took right? Just add both semester GPA's and divide by 2?
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jtbell
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#2
Apr21-11, 01:45 PM
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Take your grade for each course and multiply it by the number of credits for that course. Add up all the products, and divide that sum by the total number of credits.

On second thought, here's an alternative method: multiply your previous GPA by the number of credits on which that GPA is based. Multiply your GPA for this semester (alone) by the number of credits you are taking this semester. Add the two products, and divide by the total number of credits. This assumes that both GPAs were calculated using the procedure above.
physics girl phd
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#3
Apr21-11, 03:44 PM
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If you are REALLY lost about how a GPA is calculated (as it sounds like you are) 'google' "Online GPA calculator"... you'll see a few links (at this present point I personally think the second link is better than the first). I don't personally guarantee they work (I would calculate mine myself if I were a student)... but chances are the top links are good (especially if you are lost as to how the calculation is done).

FYI: Your present term has more credits, it's average grade WILL be weighted more highly (so the divide by 2 is completely wrong). Also, in the calculation, A's have a higher weight (4) than B's (which have a weight of 3), etc. I think you missed this idea.

Edin_Dzeko
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#4
Apr21-11, 06:48 PM
P: 223

To calculate my cumulative GPA would I just...


I'm a little confused here.

First semester I took 12 credits but earned only 8 of the 12. This semester I'm taking 18 but I'm expecting to earn 14 of the 18.

Now you said: multiply your previous GPA by the number of credits on which that GPA is based. Multiply your GPA for this semester (alone) by the number of credits you are taking this semester. Add the two products, and divide by the total number of credits.

I have only 8 credits earned on my transcript even though it also says I attempted 12 credits. So, 3.11 x 12 = 37.32 but on my transcript, quality points = 24.90 which means they multiplied by 8(credits earned) and not 12(credits attempted because I withdrew) and they rounded it because 3.11 x 8 = 24.88 ~ 24.90

so: 3.11 x 8 = 24.90
currently 1.7 x 14 = 23.8

24.90 + 23.8 = 48.7 / (14+8 = 22) = 2.21 cumulative GPA

Did I do it right? Now the confusion is this:
You said, "multiply your GPA for this semester by the number of credits YOU ARE TAKING. I am TAKING 18 credits but I'm expecting to earn 14 of the 18. So would I multiply by 14/18? Because I am taking 18 but might only earn 14. And judging from my transcript it looks like they multiplied by credits earned and not attempted.
Ryker
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#5
Apr21-11, 07:55 PM
P: 1,089
Alright, I don't get what the big conundrum here is. Isn't GPA in the US or wherever you are calculated as a simple weighted average? I mean, if you don't get a grade in (you don't pass/take) a certain course, it obviously won't count towards your GPA. Just take a course and its credit (Ai), multiply it by its "weight", ie. grade (Bi), and then iterate from i = 1 to i = n (where n is the amount of courses you got a grade in). Then divide by the sum of all credits passed and you're done.
Vanadium 50
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#6
Apr21-11, 08:20 PM
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If you don't pass a course, the 0 is averaged. If you don't complete a course (i.e. drop it) there is no 0 to average.
jtbell
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#7
Apr21-11, 08:57 PM
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Yes, I'm sorry... I didn't take into account that you've apparently been withdrawing from courses.

Policies may obviously differ from one school to another, but where I teach: if you withdraw from a course before the deadline for doing so (here, it's about halfway through the semester), it appears on your transcript with a WP or WF grade depending on whether you were doing passing or failing work when you withdrew, but it does not figure into your GPA calculation in any way. If you fail a course (that is, don't withdraw, and get an F at the end), its credit hours are included in the GPA calculation, but it doesn't contribute any quality points (grade * credit hours).
FunGus
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#8
Apr22-11, 11:07 AM
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It really depends on your school. Read your school's grading policy carefully, it's usually found in the catalog.
Nano-Passion
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#9
Aug30-11, 12:52 AM
P: 1,306
Here:

http://www.college-scholarships.com/...calculator.htm

My favorite one to use thus far.


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