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Relationship between mass and surface temperature of a star

by jewfro420
Tags: mass, relationship, star, surface, temperature
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jewfro420
#1
May5-11, 12:55 PM
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i was wondering if there is a relationship between mass and temperature that would allow me to calculate the surface temperature of a blue super giant of 24 solar masses?

or do i simply need more information to do this
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Drakkith
#2
May9-11, 07:10 PM
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I think you would need to know things like age of the star, makeup of the star, and similar stuff.
qraal
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May11-11, 05:05 AM
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Quote Quote by jewfro420 View Post
i was wondering if there is a relationship between mass and temperature that would allow me to calculate the surface temperature of a blue super giant of 24 solar masses?

or do i simply need more information to do this
It's roughly T = T(sol)*M0.5 with M in solar masses.

FtlIsAwesome
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May11-11, 12:07 PM
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Relationship between mass and surface temperature of a star

Quote Quote by qraal View Post
It's roughly T = T(sol)*M0.5 with M in solar masses.
By using T = 5,778 * 24^0.5
I get 28,306 K, which is slightly outside the 30,000 K - 52,000 K range for O class stars.
So either I didn't use it right, or it doesn't work for O class stars.

Probably what will be an important factor in determining surface temp is the spectral class (O B A F G K M), and luminosity.
Vanadium 50
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May11-11, 05:42 PM
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24 solar masses is enormous. This is more than Rigel; it's looking like something like Alnitak. Which, by the way, is around 30K. Getting within 10% with a hand-wavy formula is pretty good.
Drakkith
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May11-11, 05:47 PM
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Am I incorrect in thinking that age, metal content, and other various factors would affect the stars temp as well?
jewfro420
#7
May20-11, 09:19 PM
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so basically i think that there is no relationship between mass and temperature for non main sequence stars so this cant be done. cheers for your help anyways
FtlIsAwesome
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May22-11, 09:47 AM
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Quote Quote by jewfro420 View Post
so basically i think that there is no relationship between mass and temperature for non main sequence stars so this cant be done. cheers for your help anyways
There might be a correlation between brightness/magnitude/luminosity and temperature, but that's just my guess.


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