Why the plane of the rings is vertical to the rotation axis of Saturn?


by Chris2MIT
Tags: acceration, rings, saturn
Chris2MIT
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May11-11, 08:10 PM
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Why the plane of the rings is vertical to the rotation axis of Saturn?
I don't think this is a coincidence, because the orbits of the 8 planets in our Solar System is roughly in a plane, and some galaxies are like a plate, so does the accretion plane of the black hole. But as we know, satellites rotating around the earth can go in the orbit whose rotation axis is not coincide to that of the earth. So why couldn't the rings tilted at an angle to the rotation axis of Saturn?

Therefore, I guess that: Is the phenomenon of Saturn's rings indicates that suppose we do nothing to the earth's satellites, they will all end up rotating earth in a plane vertical to the rotation axis of earth?



P.S.:
Now I can understand and imagine why the ring appears like a plant instead of some other shape, but this problem remains to be solved.

I am a Chinese student, and I don't know if I had described my questions clearly. It would be great if you can also offer some suggestions about my English.

And finally, thank you very much.
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Chronos
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May11-11, 09:20 PM
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Planets are believed to form from accretion discs. The obvious explanation is the source material of rings originated in these accretion discs.
Chris2MIT
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May11-11, 09:37 PM
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Quote Quote by Chronos View Post
Planets are believed to form from accretion discs. The obvious explanation is the source material of rings originated in these accretion discs.
That's true. Rings and accretions are sure to form. But what I wanna know is that why the plane is vertical to the rotation axis? Can it not be vertical?

twofish-quant
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May11-11, 09:40 PM
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Why the plane of the rings is vertical to the rotation axis of Saturn?


Quote Quote by Chris2MIT View Post
That's true. Rings and accretions are sure to form. But what I wanna know is that why the plane is vertical to the rotation axis? Can it not be vertical?
I think it would be hard. The rotation creates a bulge which will pull particles toward the equator.
russ_watters
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May11-11, 09:50 PM
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Quote Quote by Chris2MIT View Post
That's true. Rings and accretions are sure to form. But what I wanna know is that why the plane is vertical to the rotation axis? Can it not be vertical?
The disc is a disc! All the matter that becomes the planet and the rings is rotating about the same axis before it forms.
Chris2MIT
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May11-11, 10:12 PM
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Quote Quote by twofish-quant View Post
I think it would be hard. The rotation creates a bulge which will pull particles toward the equator.
I think your words can only explain why ring appears. Why can't it be like this in my attachment?
Attached Thumbnails
Saturn illustrate.JPG  
Hurkyl
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May11-11, 10:17 PM
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Quote Quote by Chris2MIT View Post
I think your words can only explain why ring appears. Why can't it be like this in my attachment?
"The rotation creates a bulge which will pull particles toward the equator."
Chris2MIT
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May12-11, 08:40 AM
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Quote Quote by Hurkyl View Post
"The rotation creates a bulge which will pull particles toward the equator."
Well, could you say my theory is wrong?
And can you explain why?
russ_watters
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May12-11, 11:20 AM
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What theory?
Drakkith
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May13-11, 01:28 AM
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Quote Quote by Chris2MIT View Post
Well, could you say my theory is wrong?
And can you explain why?
When a planet is rotating it's equator will be slightly larger than the pole - pole circumference is. Unless the rings are closely aligned with the rotation and hence the equator, the areas of the ring near the equator experience a greater pull from gravity than they do elsewhere. This creates instability in the rings and would most likely cause them to come apart very quickly.

I think your words can only explain why ring appears. Why can't it be like this in my attachment?
I would say that it is entirely POSSIBLE that rings can form like your example has them. A moon or collection of other orbiting bodies that were broken up somehow into tiny pieces could have been orbiting differently than they normally do. However the rings would be unstable and would not last long at all. It is simply much more likely that rings will form in the same axis as the rotation for the reasons mentioned in the above posts.
Hurkyl
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May13-11, 01:44 AM
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Quote Quote by Drakkith View Post
I would say that it is entirely POSSIBLE that rings can form like your example has them. A moon or collection of other orbiting bodies that were broken up somehow into tiny pieces could have been orbiting differently than they normally do.
Such as Saturn's Phoebe ring, if you count it as a ring.
Chris2MIT
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May13-11, 08:51 AM
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Quote Quote by Drakkith View Post
When a planet is rotating it's equator will be slightly larger than the pole - pole circumference is. Unless the rings are closely aligned with the rotation and hence the equator, the areas of the ring near the equator experience a greater pull from gravity than they do elsewhere. This creates instability in the rings and would most likely cause them to come apart very quickly.



I would say that it is entirely POSSIBLE that rings can form like your example has them. A moon or collection of other orbiting bodies that were broken up somehow into tiny pieces could have been orbiting differently than they normally do. However the rings would be unstable and would not last long at all. It is simply much more likely that rings will form in the same axis as the rotation for the reasons mentioned in the above posts.
Thanks, I think your words helped me a lot. You are very possibly right.


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