When a man get a shock(current) why he is cought then thrown away?


by waqarrashid33
Tags: cought, shockcurrent, thrown
waqarrashid33
waqarrashid33 is offline
#1
May31-11, 04:46 PM
P: 77
When a living thing get a current shock then current catch him for sometime and then throw him away?
Why this happen?
Why the wire(or something else from where current is coming) catch him and then thrown him after the current stops or the thing died?
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ckutlu
ckutlu is offline
#2
May31-11, 05:39 PM
P: 33
I haven't seen someone got a real high current shock and thrown away in my life but i'll guess that'd probably be caused by the person's uncontrolled muscle spasms caused by the shock. It's just a guess.
santo35
santo35 is offline
#3
Jun1-11, 09:32 AM
P: 20
its not true that the get caught nd thrown...when u touch a high voltage with ur palm facing the wire you tend to close your hand and contract your muscle(dont ask me y ! i seldom read bio!)....but have you ever seen electricians? they usually test the wires by touching them with fingers with palm not facing the wire...(if the dont have the electrical tester ofcourse:P)...

Evil Bunny
Evil Bunny is offline
#4
Jun1-11, 01:28 PM
P: 237

When a man get a shock(current) why he is cought then thrown away?


Electricity causes your muscles to contract. You don't get thrown back when you get a shock... Like Santo said, contracting hand muscles with the wire in your palm will actually cause you to hold on and not be able to let go (if the current is high enough). Some people believe that AC is less dangerous because you can somehow let go between the alternations, but I'm not buying it.

I don't recommend trying it, of course :-)
Drakkith
Drakkith is offline
#5
Jun1-11, 07:00 PM
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Wikipedia says:
A sustained electric shock from AC at 120 V, 60 Hz is an especially dangerous source of ventricular fibrillation because it usually exceeds the let-go threshold, while not delivering enough initial energy to propel the person away from the source.
I'll have to look up some more on this...


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