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Physics homework hanging stone

by iampaul
Tags: homework, physics, stone
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iampaul
#1
Aug4-11, 02:36 AM
P: 79
1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
A stone hangs by a fine thread from the ceiling and a section of the same thread dangles from the bottom of the stone.

2. Relevant equations

a. If a person gives a sharp pull on the dangling thread, where is the thread likely to break: below the stone or above it?
b. What if the person gives a slow and steady pull?
Explain your answer.

3. The attempt at a solution
I think that the answer for a is below while for b the answer is above, but I don't know exactly how. Can someone please explain this in detail. Thanks
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PeterO
#2
Aug4-11, 02:47 AM
HW Helper
P: 2,316
Quote Quote by iampaul View Post
1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
A stone hangs by a fine thread from the ceiling and a section of the same thread dangles from the bottom of the stone.

2. Relevant equations

a. If a person gives a sharp pull on the dangling thread, where is the thread likely to break: below the stone or above it?
b. What if the person gives a slow and steady pull?
Explain your answer.

3. The attempt at a solution
I think that the answer for a is below while for b the answer is above, but I don't know exactly how. Can someone please explain this in detail. Thanks
have a look at the tensions in the string, if the stone has a mass of 10kg, and a second 2 kg stone was attached to the bottom of the lower string.

What happens to those tensions is the 2 kg stone is replaced by a 4kg stone? 6kg? 8kg? 12kg? 14kg? ......

That should give you a clue for part (b)

Answer me that and I will give you a hint about (a)
EDIT: for speed of calculation, and because each stone could have been a little heavier any way, use g=10 m/s^2


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