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Did Curtis LeMay Discover Fractal Geometry in 1942?

by bobschunk
Tags: 1942, curtis, discover, fractal, geometry, lemay
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Dickfore
#19
Aug7-11, 08:56 AM
P: 3,014
Also, notice the year when Hausdorff introduced this concept:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hausdorff_dimension

and compare it to the year stated in the title of your thread.
bobschunk
#20
Aug7-11, 09:06 AM
P: 14
Quote Quote by Dickfore View Post
Could you please define this concept?
WHAT IS THIS, A DISSERTATION DEFENSE?????

As the great Joey Ramone once said: "What is this? What's in it for me?"

I've actually defined this concept in my last couple of posts. Nature, being economical, limits herself to a few structures which she repeats at different scales. Look at how the vascular systems of leaves emulate tree branches, and how tree branches emulate trees. Look at how atoms resemble solar systems and galaxies. Fractal geometry is a geometrical framework for understanding nature, the proof of which does not require any slavish emulation on the part of nature, which geometry is ABSTRACTED from nature, which nature, in turn, posesses finite resources with which to implement abstract patterns.

WHEW!!!
Dickfore
#21
Aug7-11, 09:08 AM
P: 3,014
Quote Quote by bobschunk View Post
Look at how atoms resemble solar systems and galaxies.
How exactly do atoms resemble galaxies?
bobschunk
#22
Aug7-11, 09:13 AM
P: 14
Quote Quote by Dickfore View Post
Also, notice the year when Hausdorff introduced this concept:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hausdorff_dimension

and compare it to the year stated in the title of your thread.
OK, so it was 1918. But he didn't take his observations far enough: it's the basis for fractal geometry, but it just doesn't go far enough to constitute fractal geometry.
Dickfore
#23
Aug7-11, 09:18 AM
P: 3,014
Quote Quote by bobschunk View Post
OK, so it was 1918. But he didn't take his observations far enough: it's the basis for fractal geometry, but it just doesn't go far enough to constitute fractal geometry.
Ok, then read up on fractals on Wikipedia. The concept originated in the XVII century.
bobschunk
#24
Aug7-11, 09:30 AM
P: 14
Quote Quote by Dickfore View Post
How exactly do atoms resemble galaxies?
OK, so now you're just getting tedious.

Galaxies and atoms have stuff in the middle and other stuff surrounding it. Galaxies have stuff spinning around their centers, whereas atoms have electrons existing in quantum levels surrounding their nuclei, but the overall similarity is obvious: it's structural repetition which allows for compression of data required to be conserved according to the quantum principle of unitarity.

I'm really going to have to take a break from this tedium, seeing as my physical health is extremely poor, and I really haven't the energy for this type of nonsense.
Dickfore
#25
Aug7-11, 09:32 AM
P: 3,014
Quote Quote by bobschunk View Post
this type of nonsense.
Indeed.


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