Polarized light


by KingBigness
Tags: light, polarized
KingBigness
KingBigness is offline
#1
Oct10-11, 09:11 PM
P: 94
When light is emitted from a source it is nearly always unpolarised meaning the E and B fields lie in randomly directed mutually perpendicular planes. When Light goes through a polarising filter it causes the fields to uniform mutually perpendicular planes.

My question is however, once light is polarised can you 'unpolarise' the light? In otherwords can you 'rescatter' the E and B fields?
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Matterwave
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#2
Oct11-11, 12:25 AM
P: 2,043
Sure, reflect the light off a (jaggedy) surface should do the trick.
Cantstandit
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#3
Oct11-11, 02:43 AM
P: 30
Isn't reflected light always polarised?

Andy Resnick
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#4
Oct11-11, 08:19 AM
Sci Advisor
P: 5,468

Polarized light


Quote Quote by KingBigness View Post
When light is emitted from a source it is nearly always unpolarised meaning the E and B fields lie in randomly directed mutually perpendicular planes. When Light goes through a polarising filter it causes the fields to uniform mutually perpendicular planes.

My question is however, once light is polarised can you 'unpolarise' the light? In otherwords can you 'rescatter' the E and B fields?
Converting fully polarized light to randomly polarized light is not trivial and generally requires multiple scattering (either from a rough surface, a pair of counter-rotating ground glass plates, or something called a 'scrambler' http://www.klccgo.com/cqmscramb.htm).


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