Register to reply

Pendulum/Simple Harmonic Motion, what is its energy of motion?

by nicoleb14
Tags: pendulum, shm
Share this thread:
nicoleb14
#1
Nov16-11, 02:09 AM
P: 11
A 1.2 kg mass attached to a spring oscillates with an amplitude of 5.1 cm and a frequency of 2.1 Hz. What is its energy of motion?

I just have to use KE=1/2mv^2 right?
do I have to involve the amplitude?
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
Wildfires and other burns play bigger role in climate change, professor finds
SR Labs research to expose BadUSB next week in Vegas
New study advances 'DNA revolution,' tells butterflies' evolutionary history
grzz
#2
Nov16-11, 02:15 AM
P: 950
In SHM the KE is continually varying. So you are asking for the MAX KE, right?
nicoleb14
#3
Nov16-11, 02:28 AM
P: 11
I just need the energy of motion, so i guess that means KE max?

technician
#4
Nov16-11, 02:50 AM
P: 1,506
Pendulum/Simple Harmonic Motion, what is its energy of motion?

The KE max will be the total energy of the motion.
You are correct to use KE=1/2mv^2 but you need an expression for vmax in simple harmonic motion. You will need to find the spring constant (stiffness) and use this to find the max velocity.
Do you know these equations?
grzz
#5
Nov16-11, 02:52 AM
P: 950
What is the max linear velocity in SHM?
nicoleb14
#6
Nov16-11, 03:02 AM
P: 11
Vmax=Aw
grzz
#7
Nov16-11, 03:04 AM
P: 950
Then you can find max ke = (1/2)mv^2 and use v = Aw
nicoleb14
#8
Nov16-11, 03:15 AM
P: 11
thank you sooo muuuch!!!!! :D
PeterO
#9
Nov16-11, 03:19 AM
HW Helper
P: 2,316
Quote Quote by nicoleb14 View Post
A 1.2 kg mass attached to a spring oscillates with an amplitude of 5.1 cm and a frequency of 2.1 Hz. What is its energy of motion?

I just have to use KE=1/2mv^2 right?
do I have to involve the amplitude?
Is this mass hanging from the spring, or is this whole situation taking place horizontally??
nicoleb14
#10
Nov16-11, 03:27 AM
P: 11
the problem doesnt say
PeterO
#11
Nov16-11, 03:55 AM
HW Helper
P: 2,316
Quote Quote by nicoleb14 View Post
the problem doesnt say
Assuming it is vertical, there is a constant interchange of elastic energy in the spring, gravitational potential energy and kinetic energy.

The total of them at any time will be constant.

That might be what is meant by the energy of the motion.

Even if the situation is horizontal [so no change in gravitational potential energy] there is a steady interchange between elastic potential energy and kinetic energy.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Simple harmonic motion of a pendulum Introductory Physics Homework 1
Simple Harmonic Motion: Pendulum Introductory Physics Homework 1
Pendulum Motion (Simple Harmonic Motion) Introductory Physics Homework 0
Pendulum in Simple Harmonic Motion Introductory Physics Homework 3
Simple Harmonic Motion of a Pendulum Introductory Physics Homework 4