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Language fails that make you angry

by KingNothing
Tags: angry, fails, language
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vela
#19
Dec4-11, 10:47 PM
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When people hyper-correct and use I instead of me.

"The dog followed Sandra and I around the house."

lie vs. lay - almost no one seems to get this one right, so I think it's a lost cause.
Jimmy
#20
Dec4-11, 11:31 PM
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Quote Quote by vela View Post
When people hyper-correct and use I instead of me.

"The dog followed Sandra and I around the house."
That one bothers me as well. Who would say, "The dog followed I around the house?"

Where are you at? *cringe*

One should never end a sentence with the word at. :P
Hurkyl
#21
Dec5-11, 12:08 AM
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Quote Quote by Jimmy View Post
One should never end a sentence with the word at. :P
....
zoobyshoe
#22
Dec5-11, 03:36 AM
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Quote Quote by DaveC426913 View Post
In a myriad of ways. : vision fading:
In English, the term "myriad" is most commonly used to refer to a large number of an unspecified size. In this way "myriad" can be used as either a noun or an adjective.[1] Thus both "there are myriad people outside" and "there is a myriad of people outside" are correct.[2]

Merriam-Webster notes, "Recent criticism of the use of myriad as a noun, both in the plural form myriads and in the phrase a myriad of, seems to reflect a mistaken belief that the word was originally and is still properly only an adjective.... however, the noun is in fact the older form, dating to the 16th century. The noun myriad has appeared in the works of such writers as Milton (plural myriads) and Thoreau (a myriad of), and it continues to occur frequently in reputable English."[2]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myriad
DaveC426913
#23
Dec5-11, 08:42 AM
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Huh. Learn something new every day.
Jimmy Snyder
#24
Dec5-11, 09:00 AM
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Here are some common mistakes people make in conversation.

reed - read. You read a newpaper, not reed it. That would be like rolling it up to look like a clarinet and playing on it.

red - read. You read a newspaper, not red it. That would be like taking red paint and covering what should be black and white all over. Except the Sunday funnies.

red - wreadte. You paint a newspaper red, not wreadte. That's not even a word.

write - right. You write a letter, not right a letter. Unless the letter was tilted.

wrote - rote. You wrote a letter, not rote it. That doesn't make any sense at all.

Please be more careful in your speech in the future in order to avoid these misunderstandings.
fuzzyfelt
#25
Dec5-11, 09:52 AM
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Quote Quote by Jimmy View Post
That one bothers me as well. Who would say, "The dog followed I around the house?"

Where are you at? *cringe*

One should never end a sentence with the word at. :P
Quote Quote by Hurkyl View Post
....
:)

Haven't enjoyed this, then?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5KpmB...eature=related :)
D4V1D
#26
Dec5-11, 09:58 AM
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I'm surprised nobody has brought up:
You're vs. Your
Their vs. There vs. They're

Also, I hate it when people put an 'a' in the word 'definitely'.
To quote a comic from theoatmeal.com, "If you put an 'a' in 'definitely', you are definitely an a-hole".
Ben Niehoff
#27
Dec5-11, 10:29 AM
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How about when "definitely" turns into "defiantly"? This one always reveals who is relying on spell- and grammar-check, as neither one will catch this mistake.
daveb
#28
Dec5-11, 10:38 AM
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Quote Quote by Ben Niehoff View Post
How about when "definitely" turns into "defiantly"? This one always reveals who is relying on spell- and grammar-check, as neither one will catch this mistake.
I can forgive that slight mistake if it is due to a long string of text and a person merely overlooks it. I cringe more when it is spelled definately
fourier jr
#29
Dec5-11, 10:41 AM
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m-w has a couple good lists of this sort of thing
http://www.merriam-webster.com/top-t...unt-flout.html
http://www.merriam-webster.com/top-t...flesh-out.html
vela
#30
Dec5-11, 01:15 PM
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Quote Quote by D4V1D View Post
I'm surprised nobody has brought up:
You're vs. Your
Their vs. There vs. They're
The one that really used to bug me is its vs. it's. Now I've become numb to it.

Misspellings don't really bother me, but some do mystify me, like taunt instead of taut. I guess it's not really a misspelling. Some people think taunt means taut.
256bits
#31
Dec5-11, 01:29 PM
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English, she be a evolving , and them there fails will be part of a properly spoken language in the years to come..
Ben Niehoff
#32
Dec5-11, 01:34 PM
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Here are some more:

advise vs. advice: "advise" is a verb; "advice" is a noun.

everyday vs. every day: "everyday" is an adjective meaning "commonplace". "every day" is an adverbial phrase meaning "daily".

Also a whole slew of words ending in -ant vs. -ent, e.g. "relevant", "independent"...these are often mixed up.

i.e. vs. e.g.: "i.e." stands for "id est", meaning "that is"; it should be followed by a paraphrase or something explanatory. "e.g." stands for "exempli gratia", meaning "for the sake of example", and should be followed by a list of examples.

I think the word with the most variety is "definitely". In addition to what's already been posted, let's not forget "definantly".

Edited to add "heighth" and "weighth". Should I start saying "breadt" and "widt" to such people?
hotvette
#33
Dec5-11, 02:16 PM
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- the point is mute (instead of moot)

- I'm glad the word 'solution' has ceased being treated as a verb. For a few years (at least in business), people of been 'solutioning' problems.
DaveC426913
#34
Dec5-11, 03:11 PM
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Quote Quote by hotvette View Post
- the point is mute (instead of moot)
+1

"The point is moo -
- a cow's opinion. It just doesn't matter. It's moo."
Joey Tribbianni

dacruick
#35
Dec5-11, 03:11 PM
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This might not exactly fit in with the others, but my pet peeve is when people say over-exaggerate. I've lost many arguments related to this before, as it has shown up in a dictionary or two. The redundancy kills me. It just gets me over-overwhelmed...
DaveC426913
#36
Dec5-11, 03:12 PM
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Quote Quote by dacruick View Post
This might not exactly fit in with the others, but my pet peeve is when people say over-exaggerate. I've lost many arguments related to this before, as it has shown up in a dictionary or two. The redundancy kills me. It just gets me over-overwhelmed...
You should redouble your efforts to remain calm.


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