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How Many Of You Know Greek?

by onlinementor
Tags: greek
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Proton Soup
#19
Dec19-11, 11:23 AM
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maybe if the Greeks had learned Greek, their economy wouldn't be up the creek
SW VandeCarr
#20
Dec19-11, 11:34 AM
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Αριστοτέλης κανόνες!
Office_Shredder
#21
Dec19-11, 02:35 PM
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Μπορώ να χρησιμοποιήσω το Google Translate πάρα πολύ
MATLABdude
#22
Dec20-11, 04:50 AM
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Quote Quote by onlinementor View Post
I see a lot of people having problems in physics in here but almost all of those problems could be solved if Greek was taught in the elementary curriculum.

How many of you were taught Greek, learned Greek, or still don't know why it's so important?
I think learning Greek is absolutely essential! For a lesser example, that's how knowledge of the letter 'a' in the Latin alphabet lends itself to the understanding of the antidisestablishmentarianist movement in 16th century England and its applicability to 21st century American separation between church and state! That aside, you may wish to address your fundamental weakness and force yourself to learn Hindu and Arabic to properly do math.
SW VandeCarr
#23
Dec20-11, 05:46 AM
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Quote Quote by MATLABdude View Post
I think learning Greek is absolutely essential! For a lesser example, that's how knowledge of the letter 'a' in the Latin alphabet lends itself to the understanding of the antidisestablishmentarianist movement in 16th century England and its applicability to 21st century American separation between church and state! That aside, you may wish to address your fundamental weakness and force yourself to learn Hindu and Arabic to properly do math.
Could you please translate this into Greek so I can really truly understand it? I would also like to say that Aristotle had the Theory of Everything over 2300 years ago. Today's physicists should be trying to find the right combinations of earth, air, water and fire that different things are made of rather than building gigantic machines to find some ridiculously small particle they call the Higgs boson. How could something so small be important anyway?

The physicist's place is in the kitchen, testing recipes. It's true this will involve some dirt, but there's nothing wrong with getting your hands dirty with honest work.
MATLABdude
#24
Dec20-11, 06:20 AM
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Quote Quote by SW VandeCarr View Post
Could you please translate this into Greek so I can really truly understand it? I would also like to say that Aristotle had the Theory of Everything over 2300 years ago. Today's physicists should be trying to find the right combinations of earth, air, water and fire that different things are made of rather than building gigantic machines to find some ridiculously small particle they call the Higgs boson. How could something so small be important anyway?

The physicist's place is in the kitchen, testing recipes. It's true this will involve some dirt, but there's nothing wrong with getting your hands dirty with honest work.
How very... Roman and plebeian of you. A pure scientist would never get involved in such grad-studently and technician-oriented activities so as to get, ugh, dirty.
madshiver
#25
Dec20-11, 03:46 PM
P: 9
Having grown up in Greece and then moving to Germany left me utterly confused. I used to write the greek alpha symbol the same way I wrote "a". And then suddenly they were writing a fish-like symbol and that was supposed to be an alpha and the same exercise had both "alpha" and "a"... This took some time getting used to.. (Same problem with lower-case \nu and "v").

(For the first few weeks though I enjoyed having ξ, φ, θ in my arsenal, but soon enough the professors started using them too and it was not as cool anymore ;(. )
skippy1729
#26
Dec20-11, 04:13 PM
P: 148
Quote Quote by humanino View Post
To learn math, you first have to learn hebrew.
Roger Penrose and S. Chandrashekar both ran out of alphabets in some of their books and had to steal eth and thorn from from the Old English alphabet. So, I guess reading Beowulf in the original Old English will help you learn about spinors and Black Holes!


Skippy
Office_Shredder
#27
Dec20-11, 04:37 PM
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Quote Quote by madshiver View Post
(Same problem with lower-case \nu and "v").
I'm pretty sure everybody has problems with these
FtlIsAwesome
#28
Dec20-11, 07:58 PM
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Soon, mathmeticians and scientists are going to run out of Greek and Herbrew letters.
I suggest that they start using Chinese characters, that way no one will have to worry about running out for a long time.
thinktank2
#29
Dec21-11, 03:46 PM
P: 9
I don't want to brag but I know Greek, Hebrew, Japanese, Klingon, Chinese, German, Italian...


and 42 other such words.
SW VandeCarr
#30
Dec21-11, 04:01 PM
P: 2,499
Quote Quote by thinktank2 View Post
I don't want to brag but I know Greek, Hebrew, Japanese, Klingon, Chinese, German, Italian...


and 42 other such words.
Klingon, eh?


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