Twin Turbo 4 cylinder Engine?


by KidWonder
Tags: cylinder, engine, turbo, twin
KidWonder
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#1
Feb18-12, 07:26 PM
P: 22
Hey Guys, I'm fairly new to this forum.

I would just like to know is their a way to allow for a four cylinder engine to produce for more engine gas to spin 2 turbos. As I researched on forced induction, I've found that Twin turbos on a four cylinder might be one turbo too many, though I imagine the spin-up (lag free) benefits of two teensy, weensy turbos might be there as on a bigger motor. I'm in High School, and planning on studying Mechanical Engineering at Ohio State, then start a car company(not likely).

Thanks Guys
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Ranger Mike
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#2
Feb19-12, 04:30 AM
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welcome fellow Buckeye
I do not know but would recommend you research the Offenhauser 4 cylinder engine that was refined to the ultimate 4 cylinder thru Indy years as a start.
rm
2milehi
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#3
Feb19-12, 11:33 PM
P: 100
From Subaru

Frosteh
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#4
Feb20-12, 01:02 AM
P: 8

Twin Turbo 4 cylinder Engine?


Look up what people do to their road/rally cars from Subaru and Mitsubishi. There are countless sites and threads from people who have twin blown their 4 bangers. However, why would you want to? On a small 4 banger, you certainly won't need that much boost and you'll have to figure out other stuff before you can drive it. Simply slapping on a couple turbos doesn't make a fast car. A good GT40 turbo will provide plenty of air to a 4 cylinder. Single turbos also spool quicker and require a lot less engine modification inside the small engine bay of a 4 cyl. car.
The Chase
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#5
Mar3-12, 09:29 AM
P: 22
Twin turbo systems would be classed as an odd choice for a performance small 4 cylinder engine used for automotive use. Twin turbos are (in general) phasing out due to modern turbine development of multi-vane or variable-nozzle turbines which allow for a single turbine to operate over a far wider range of exhaust gas flow rate than was possible twenty years ago, therefore applications which would have been twin turbo to achieve a usable power-band all round have been phased out to multi-vane or variable nozzle single turbocharger applications which offer inherently less frictional losses and complexity. That being said, twin turbochargers are still used on some flat-plane V8's and Boxer configurations as each bank of cylinders opperates a seperate exhaust system.
xxChrisxx
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#6
Mar3-12, 12:11 PM
P: 2,032
Quote Quote by Frosteh View Post
Simply slapping on a couple turbos doesn't make a fast car. A good GT40 turbo will provide plenty of air to a 4 cylinder. Single turbos also spool quicker and require a lot less engine modification inside the small engine bay of a 4 cyl. car.
I don't know if this irony or not.


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