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What does symmetry in GR mean and where does it lead?

by Naty1
Tags: lead, symmetry
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Messenger
#19
Mar12-12, 08:37 AM
P: 68
Here is a candidate for hidden symmetry in GR :

[tex]R_{\mu \nu}-\frac{1}{2}g_{\mu \nu}R=G_{\mu \nu}=g_{\mu \nu}\Lambda-\Pi_{\mu \nu}[/tex]

Personally, I think it leads to a link between gravity, quantum theory and the accelerating expansion. Just my opinion though.

If you would like to debate this, please go to the forum http://www.bautforum.com/showthread....ral-Relativity

(mods: Please let me know if the link is not allowed, I will delete.)
Mentz114
#20
Mar12-12, 12:20 PM
PF Gold
P: 4,087
Quote Quote by lugita15 View Post
No, only a very small number of exact mathematical solutions are known for the Einstein equations. Most solutions are not expressible using elementary functions.
There are few solutions to the equations that are physically realistic. For instance there are more than 100 perfect fluid solutions but only a few are physically acceptable. It is a problem, maybe, with the EFE that there are many solutions that are so weird they describe implausible alternative universes. Vacuum solutions are much rarer.

Messenger, what is ∏ in the equation ?
Messenger
#21
Mar12-12, 12:52 PM
P: 68
Quote Quote by Mentz114 View Post
There are few solutions to the equations that are physically realistic. For instance there are more than 100 perfect fluid solutions but only a few are physically acceptable. It is a problem, maybe, with the EFE that there are many solutions that are so weird they describe implausible alternative universes. Vacuum solutions are much rarer.

Messenger, what is ∏ in the equation ?
Just a curvature tensor, the symmetric opposite of G where if they were summed would equal [tex]\Lambda[/tex]
yoron
#22
Mar14-12, 09:56 PM
P: 244
As you are here Messenger, why not open a thread from scratch. Start it with trying to describe where you think your idea differ from what we use now. Then try to explain it as simple as possible. Don't hesitate to put in historical references if you find it appropriate.

If you succeed with coming through using words you will have built a framework for understanding your equations, and also give all a chance to see where your thinking take you. It's like writing that v e r y important letter to someone :) You start out, then throw it in the wastebasket, just to try again. After the tenth you finally find yourself satisfied, alternatively just giving up on it, as you find yourself unable to formulate it the right way.

You have already written some letters, write one more and see if it comes out as you want it.
Messenger
#23
Mar14-12, 10:21 PM
P: 68
Hi yoron,
That would get me banned on PF. Did find another forum where I could discuss it, and in the mean time have heard back from the editors of a journal who recommended me to two others. Will post the link here if it is accepted.
yoron
#24
Mar14-12, 11:30 PM
P: 244
Oh, sorry about that. I looked at your other (first) forum and was frankly surprised over the lack of response you got to your original question. Otherwise I have found those guys and gals to be quite interesting to read at times.


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