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New objection to wormholes

by sshai45
Tags: objection, wormholes
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sshai45
#1
Mar10-12, 02:30 AM
P: 64
Hi.

I saw on this site:

http://physics.stackexchange.com/que...ugh-a-wormhole

Wormholes linking distant spacetime points are forbidden in string theory (as far as we know) and in modern gravity, because you would be able to make information loss in a local region by dumping one of two entangled pairs into the wormhole, and letting it come out elsewhere.
Has anyone else seen this objection? It's one I haven't seen before, thus the scare-quoted "new" in the title. Not sure if this is the right place to post or if it should be posted in the "beyond the standard model" section, but since the objection apparently isn't just in string theory, but in "modern gravity"...
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HarryRool
#2
Mar10-12, 10:26 PM
P: 51
String theory has nothing specific to say about information loss.

Preservation of information ("unitary evolution" from initial conditions) is basic to quantum theory.

Information loss through a wormhole is not a concern, because the location of the "lost" information is perfectly clear (on the other side of the wormhole). The info is not lost.

Information loss is concern, however, for black holes. They swallow the information, evaporate, and thereby vanish from the universe along with the info they ingested. This is the so-called "Black hole information problem".

Bottom line: There is no "wormhole information problem".
sshai45
#3
Mar11-12, 03:28 AM
P: 64
Quote Quote by HarryRool View Post
String theory has nothing specific to say about information loss.

Preservation of information ("unitary evolution" from initial conditions) is basic to quantum theory.

Information loss through a wormhole is not a concern, because the location of the "lost" information is perfectly clear (on the other side of the wormhole). The info is not lost.

Information loss is concern, however, for black holes. They swallow the information, evaporate, and thereby vanish from the universe along with the info they ingested. This is the so-called "Black hole information problem".

Bottom line: There is no "wormhole information problem".
So then why the objection? As if it's based on real physics, one should be able to find a text book, paper, etc. somewhere that mentions it. But this suggests it isn't.


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